• Graphic Era Deemed to Be University, India
  • Title:A Systematic Review of Agricultural Policies in Terms of Drivers, Enablers, and Bottlenecks: Comparison of Three Indian States and a Model Bio-energy Village Located in Different Agro Climatic Regions
  • Time :04:55 - 05:20 PM

Abstract
Agricultural policies play a crucial part in any economy, Sustainable agriculture policy ensure food safety and socio-economic development but also vary considerably across the various regions of the world, A comparative policy analysis helps to determine various positive and negative factors which can help and promote the implementation of sustainable agriculture policies for future. This article compares three Indian states and one German bio village in terms of their policy. This study uses a systematic literature review of 72 published Journal articles indexed in reputed databases to first identify the key drivers, enablers, and bottlenecks and subsequently, in terms of these, compares agricultural policies of the three best performing states in India (Punjab, Gujarat, Sikkim) and bio-village Juhnde (Germany). NVivo software is used for the content analysis to check the word frequency and relevancy of the research done, ranking of these states, and bio-village extends key takeaway for crafting effective and efficient agricultural policies that can be replicated in other regions. Indian states of Punjab and Gujarat are still lagging in terms of sustainable agricultural policies, exploitation of natural resources is the main concern in both the two states, issues such as low groundwater table and excessive use of chemical fertilizers are still the main bottlenecks for Punjab and Gujarat province. Secondly, the Indian north-eastern state Sikkim has shown the world how the best policies can promote socioeconomic development in any region, the state government of Sikkim has worked as an enabler for the agriculture sector. Germany’s first bio village has paved the way to the other German villages, Juhnde village has set an example for other villages and provinces to install bioenergy plants.

Biography
Dr. Sushant Tomar holds Masters in Business admininsration degree in Marketing and Retail, currently a research scholar pursuing Ph.D. in Organic farming policies in context to value chain development from Graphic Era (Deemed to be University) Dehradun, India. He is having more than 5 years of corporate experince in different verticals of sales and marketing, his core area of speicalisation is business development and project consultancy, currently he is working on the project with NABARD for upliftment of the rural organic farmers.

  • University of Sakarya, Turkey
  • Title:Investigation of Poultry Slaughterhouse Waste Stream to Produce Biofuel for Internal Utilization
  • Time :04:30 - 04:55 PM

Abstract
Poultry slaughterhouses generate an abattoir sludge (PAS) that needs proper management in the principles of circular economy and green deal goals that imply a net-zero emissions, more resource efficient and sustainable economy. This study proposes a waste-to-energy approach as a sustainable strategy for water heating by utilizing waste stream and internal usage in poultry slaughterhouse sector. In the study, energy crop Arundo donax (AD) biomass produced by irrigating treated abattoir waste water and solar dried PAS were used to produce bio pellet for the boiler heater. The solar dried PAS and grinded AD straw were extruded into pellets using a real industrial press at biomass combustion plants using i) 100% PAS:0% AD, ii) 50% PAS:50% AD, iii) 0% PAS:100% AD. The calorific value, bulk density, and energy density of the PAS, AD and PAS + AD pellets were in the range of 16.81-28.78 MJ kg-1 , 646-779 kg m-3 , and 10.86-22.71 GJ m-3 , respectively. Combustion image analysis results indicated the better flame richness and red color intensity of PAS + AD pellets than the both PAS and AD. Based on the results, almost 58% of the daily used fossil fuel coal for hot water production can be replaced by renewable PAS + AD pellets.

Biography
Dr. Aslı Simsek got her Master’s Degree in Environmental Engineer from the Faculty of Engineering, Sakarya University, Turkey in 2022. She researched poultry slaughterhouse waste stream to produce biofuel for internal utilization. Her related research paper was published in Renewable Energy journal. The research showed that PAS residue derived from poultry slaughterhouse and energy crops straw, produced using treated wastewater, are free of charge and shows a great potential to be integrated as a feedstock as raw material in fuel pellet production into the slaughterhouse water heating energy privation. Now she works as an environmental engineer and occupational health and safety specialist in a consulting company in Ankara, Turkey.

  • University of Pennsylvania, USA
  • Title:Current State of Industrial Heating and Opportunities for Decarbonization
  • Time :03:45 - 04:10 PM

Abstract
In the United States, industrial emissions represent 22% of greenhouse gas emissions and are particularly hard to decarbonize, because (1) the processes emit CO2 as a byproduct of chemical reactions and (2) these industries require high-grade heat input. This study focuses on some of these industries, namely cement, lime, glass, and steelmaking. This work details the incumbent kiln and furnace technologies and explores the emerging processes with examples of existing projects that aim to reduce carbon emissions, such as carbon capture and storage (CCS), fuel switching, and other technological changes. We provide tools to evaluate the most appropriate low-carbon solutions at existing facilities and on new-build infrastructure while taking into account the local context and resources.
This presentation highlights one state within the U.S., California, as it has a high concentration of cement, lime, glass, and steelmaking facilities. The emissions from cement, lime, and glass facilities in California total 8.5 MtCO2eq/yr. About 6.3 MtCO2/yr (7.1% of in-state industrial emissions) could be captured from cement and lime facilities, transported, and stored in sedimentary basins below the Central Valley. Replacing 20% of coal by biomass could also reduce the fossil emissions by 0.5 MtCO2/yr (6.2% of in-state industrial emissions) without making changes to the facilities. As shown by this example, there are many strategies leading to the deep decarbonization of the economy and they need to be adapted to the local context.

Biography
Dr. Maxwell Pisciotta is a 3rd-year Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania where his research is focused on carbon capture and carbon removal technologies, economics, and policy. Max also holds a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. When Max is not in the lab or completing coursework, he volunteers his time with the Climate Leaders at Penn to help educate people with non-technical backgrounds about climate change and potential solutions.

  • Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Jordan
  • Title:Mineral Policy in MENA Countries: The Case of Jordan
  • Time :03:20 - 03:45 PM

Abstract
This research paper intends to review the mineral development and investment policies of Jordan. The formulation of mining policies that will attract foreign investment must address conventionally acknowledged investor concerns and some new challenges. Issues that have been extensively examined in the paper include country’s characteristics such as geological, political, financial, regulatory, operational, fiscal, social and environmental, and profit and marketing criteria. Once these criteria are analyzed for Jordan, they have been compared to the MENA region to provide insights of possible changes and improvements to both the MENA and Jordan mineral policy. For some time, Jordan’s mineral policies were not favorable for developing the country’s mineral sector, but mineral policies are now being changed to address aspects that need improvement. With better mining regulations in place; more efficient regulatory agencies; more liberal foreign investment regulations; a competitive tax system; upgraded infrastructure; a greater availability of excellent local expertise and skills; as well as a stable economic and political system, this will position the MENA countries as an excellent place to invest in mining and create more economic diversity for the whole region.

Biography
Dr. Rami Al Rawashdeh is a Professor in Minerals Economics. He received his PhD degree in Minerals Economics from Curtin University of Technology, Australia in 2007. He received his Masters degree in Mining Engineering from Wollongong University, Australia in 2003. In 2009/2010, he held the position of the Assistant Dean of the Faculty of Engineering in Al-Hussein Bin Talal University; in 2017/2018 he was the head of Mining Engineering Department and currently he is a lecturer in the Department of Mining Engineering. He teaches courses related to mining engineering, engineering economics, engineering management for engineers,, renewable energy management, and resources evaluation. His research interests include minerals market analysis, minerals policy, feasibility of minerals projects, resource curse and economic development, and renewable energy management.

  • Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil
  • Title:Biochar and Hydrochar in the Context of Anaerobic Digestion for a Circular Approach: an overview
  • Time :02:55 - 03:20 PM

Abstract
Biochar and hydrochar are carbonaceous materials with valuable applications. They can be synthesized from a wide range of organic wastes, including digestate. Digestate is the byproduct of anaerobic digestion (AD), which is performed for bioenergy (biogas) production from organic residues. Through a thermochemical process, such as pyrolysis, gasification, and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), digestate can be converted into biochar or hydrochar. The addition of either biochar or hydrochar in AD has been reported to improve biochemical reactions and microbial growth, increasing the buffer capacity, and facilitating direct interspecies electrons transfer (DIET), resulting in higher methane (CH4) yields. Both biochar and hydrochar can adsorb undesired compounds present in biogas, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and even siloxanes. However, an integrated understanding of biochar and hydrochar produced from digestate through their return to the AD process, as additives or as adsorbents for biogas purification, is yet to be attained to close the material flow loop in a circular economy model. Therefore, this overview aimed at addressing the integration of biochar and hydrochar production from digestate, their utilization as additives and effects on AD, and their potential to adsorb biogas contaminants. This integration is supported by life cycle assessment (LCA) studies, showing positive results when combining AD and the aforementioned thermochemical processes, although more LCA is still necessary. Techno-economic assessment (TEA) studies of the processes considered are also presented, and despite an expanding market of biochar and hydrochar, further TEA is required to verify the profitability of the proposed integration, given the specificities of each process design. Overall, the synthesis of biochar and hydrochar from digestate can contribute to improving the AD process, establishing a cyclic process that is in agreement with the circular economy concept.

Biography
Dr. Matheus Cavali holds a degree in Environmental and Sanitary Engineering from the Federal University of Fronteira Sul, Brazil, and a master’s degree in Bioprocess Engineering and Biotechnology from the Federal University of Paraná, Brazil. He researched biodiesel production from agro-industrial residues through chemical and enzymatic catalysis, and also pretreatment and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass for waste valorization. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the Graduate Program in Environmental Engineering at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil, where he researches hydrochar production. He has published in different peer-reviewed journals.

  • Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), South Korea
  • Title:The Process Development of Liquid Air Energy Storage System (LAES)
  • Time :02:30 - 02:55 PM

Abstract
The development of long-term energy storage is more important today than ever because intermittent renewable energy source, such as wind and solar photovoltaic are growing rapidly in power generation market. Therefore, the demand on a bulk storage system is expected to increase significantly as result of renewable energy policy. The compressed air energy storage and liquid air energy storage system are an innovative technology for commercial grid scale energy storage. Especially liquid air energy storage system is expected to overcome the drawbacks of pumped hydro storage and compressed air energy storage. The proposed system is a novel stand-alone LAES system to enhance Round-Trip Efficiency (RTE) using a sensible heat store of packed bed type and latent heat store unit. The cryogenic Phase Change Material (PCM) melts at 110K based on experimental result, making it possible to provide cold enerrgy at a constant temperature for air liquefaction. The analysis shows that the implementation of energy recycling from the compressor and cold thermal store leads to a high RTE than conventional LAES system.

Biography
Ju-Yeol Ryu received B.S degree in dept. Of mechanical eng. from Yeungnam University in 2010 and MSc in mechanical eng. from Sungkyunkwan University in 2021. He worked Samsung C&T Corporation for 6 years since 2010 as basic design process engineer. He is currently a senior researcher at Institute for Advanced Engineering(IAE). He research focues on long-term mechanical Energy Storage System(ESS) to supply power energy stably such as Liquid Air Energy Storage(LAES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES).

  • Cairo University, Egypt
  • Title:Integrated Approach for Sustainability Assessment in Power Plant Projects using Building Information Modeling
  • Time :02:05 - 02:30 PM

Abstract
This research proposes a framework for sustainability assessment for power plant projects. The proposed framework integrates sustainability and Building Information Modeling (BIM) to achieve enhanced results concerning sustainability assessment in the power plants sector. International and regional sustainability rating systems as well as design guidelines are studied to develop a new sustainability assessment system dedicated to power plant projects. A total of 54 criteria, clustered in eight categories, are considered in the rating system. These categories are: 1) Nature and Urban 2) Site, 3) Energy, 4) Water, 5) Materials and Resources,
6) Emissions and Environment, 7) Operation and Management, and 8) Culture and economy. The sustainability levels are ranked in six levels: Non-Sustainable, Improved, Enhanced, Superior, Conserving, Restorative. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is implemented to set the weights of the criteria that are considered in the proposed sustainability system. BIM is utilized to develop a plugin for the proposed rating system to determine the level of sustainability of power plant projects. The developed plugin invests the BIM model attributes to provide the stakeholder with an instantaneous sustainability metric tool that saves time and reduces the possible errors. A case study of a 100 MW power plant is presented to test the effectiveness of the developed approach in the sustainability assessment.

Biography
Dr. Ali Azzam is a Senior piping design and stress analysis Engineer in Petrojet company in Egypt. He got his Master’s Degree in integrated Engineer in in Design Projects from the Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University in 2020. His research interest is sustainable development asset integrity, mainly in Energy and oil fields. His related research paper was published in Energy for Sustainable development journal, which is Q1 ranked. The research provided an advanced dynamic method for measuring the sustainability of power plants projects by linking the criteria with the Parametric design in the Engineering design software platform, which introduces more accurate and instant results. He got the certification of Leadership in Energy and Environment Design Green Associate (LEED GA) in 2020. From 2014 he worked as a design engineer in Infrastructure, Power generation plants, and Oil and Gas fields. He participated in Megaprojects of design and rehabilitation of Infrastructure and Energy projects in Asia, Africa, and the Middle. In 2021 he started his Ph.D. journey in the Mechanical Design and Production Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt. In 2021 he established his own company which provides Engineering solutions in Infrastructure and oil fields.

  • Bharathi Women’s College, India
  • Title:A Review on the Remediation of Microplastics using Bionanomaterials
  • Time :12:15 - 12:40 PM

Abstract
Microplastics are formed by the physicochemical breakdown of plastics. It is an alarming worldwide issue with long-lasting and hazardous effects. Natural expulsion of microplastics would take several years and it might also result in dangerous outcomes. To remediate these harmful microplastics several technological innovations were developed over the years. Among them, nanotechnological techniques have been investigated to a large extent for the remediation of microplastics. However, the production of nanomaterials using physical and chemical methods have been proven to be hazardous to the environment in several ways. Bio-nanotechnology is an alternative solution. Though it is a well-known and much investigated topic, it still remains primitive when it comes to microplastic remediation. Knowledge about the extensive possibilities of bionanoremediation would serve to be useful for the researchers to develop advanced eco-friendly strategies to control and eradicate the microplastics in a sustainable manner.

Biography
Dr. Rose Mary Kiriyanthan Graduate in Plant biology and Plant Biotechnology, and a Masters in Biotechnology from Stella Maris College (Autonomous) affiliated to the University of Madras, Chennai. Currently pursuing Ph.D. in Botany from Bharathi women’s college (Autonomous) affiliated to the University of Madras, Chennai. My research experience spanning for over 4 years helped me gain 5 publications in peer reviewed journals. My research interest includes Bio-nanotechnology and Phytochemistry.

  • University of Hasselt, Belgium
  • Title:Biodiversity of Collembola on Green Roofs: A case Study of Three Cities in Belgium
  • Time :11:50 - 12:15 AM

Abstract
Green roofs are often promoted as a mean to counter the negative environmental effects of urbanization on nature and to increase the amount of green space in cities. Green roofs often enhance aboveground biodiversity, especially herbivores and pollinators. However, if and in what way they support belowground biodiversity, and more specifically soil fauna, is rarely studied. Therefore, we evaluated the diversity of a dominant group of soil fauna, Collembola (springtails), on twelve extensive green roofs in three cities in Belgium (Antwerp, Ghent and Hasselt), over a one year period. The roofs differed in height above the ground, surface area, vegetation type, and age, i.e. time since construction. We analysed if these roof characteristics influenced species richness, abundance or diversity of Collembola. In total we found ten species of Collembola. Species richness was not higher on roofs that were larger (habitat area) or closer to the ground (isolation to surrounding soil), indicating that island-biogeographic theory is not applicable to species richness in our study system. However, significant differences in the mean number of individuals (abundance) were found between different months. Collembola taxonomical composition also varied between the roofs, but this variation could not be related to any of the measured roof variables. Roof communities were characterised by hemiedaphic life forms, preferring neutral to semi-moist conditions. Apart from the age of the roof that showed a positive significant impact on the abundance of Collembola present, our results suggested that the collembolan fauna showed no significant differences in abundance, species richness or diversity between roofs with different characteristics. However, we suggest that future studies are needed to investigate whether our findings are applicable to other groups of soil-living arthropods on green roofs.

Biography
Dr Jeffrey Jacobs Master of science: evolution en behavioural-biology
PhD Research project: Biodiversity on urban green roofs: a focus on macro-invertebrates
Hisresearch focuses on assessing the biodiversity on green roofs. Green roofs have potential for providing substantial habitat to plants, birds, and arthropod species that are not well supported by other urban habitats. Whereas the plants on a typical green roof are chosen and planted by people, the arthropods that colonize it can serve as an indicator of the ability of this novel habitat to support a diverse community of organisms.
In the first part of my PhD he focussed on belowground biodiversity, which was assessed for a deliberately chosen group of soil arthropods: the springtails (Collembola). Collembola are among the most abundant and widespread terrestrial arthropods, and are important in many soil functions such as litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. However, what explains their diversity and species composition in isolated, small habitat fragments is less known.
Furthermore, are we currently investigating multiple green roofs in the city of Antwerp (Belgium) and focussing on the aboveground macro-invertebrates that live on them (main focus wild bees). This research has the potential to contribute to the academic understanding of biodiversity on green roofs, but more than this, it may have an impact on wider society. With worldwide increasing urbanization it is crucial that we understand how we can counteract the loss of biodiversity in urban areas. Green roofs are seen as the number one method to get more green spaces in cities, however there is a lack of studies in Belgium on green roofs and how they can support biodiversity. We hope that by doing so we can derive main principles regarding the design of green roofs with the aim of maximizing their macro-invertebrate biodiversity.

  • University of Milan-Bicocca, Italia
  • Title:The Self-assembly of Sepiolite and Silica fillers for Advanced Rubber Materials: The Role of Collaborative Filler Network
  • Time :11:25 - 11:50 AM

Abstract
SiO2-based nanofillers, commonly used to enhance the mechanical properties in tyres, favor a low hysteresis while maintaining sufficient reinforcement respect to the carbon black. However, a need remains to further reduce the rolling resistance of the tyres, and so to identify new fillers that allow a further improvement in the balance between hysteresis and reinforcement of materials. In this context, the present work aims at studying the self-assembly of two different white nanofillers, such as sepiolite and silica, and the role of collaborative filler network in rubber nanocomposites (NCs), considering that clay/silica hybrid systems could be a possible strategy to reduce the hysteresis of rubber materials, thanks to the potential synergistic effect between isotropic and anisotropic fillers.
Thus, rubber NCs containing silica and different kind of sepiolite were prepared by combining latex compounding technique (LCT) and melt blending. Highly filled NR masterbatches (MBs) were firstly prepared by coagulating natural rubber (NR) latex and sepiolite aqueous suspension, and then mixed with NR rubber matrix together with silica filler, silane coupling agent, vulcanizing agents, and antioxidants. An exhaustive morphological, rheological, and dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrates that the use of double white fillers, having different aspect ratios, allows to obtain a good trade-off between efficient reinforcement and low Payne effect. These results have been ascribed to the formation of a cooperative filler network, deriving from the remarkable interaction of both fillers with the polymer, as assessed by morphological and spectroscopic investigations.
This study, even if referred to clay/silica double fillers, provides clear evidence of the significant role of self-assembly of hybrid nanofillers to produce a collaborative filler network and thus advanced rubber materials.

Biography
Dr. Barbara Di Credico is Graduated in Chemistry in 2001 at University “La Sapienza” of Rome, she obtained the PhD in Inorganic Chemistry at University of Florence. After working as post-doctoral researcher at Politecnico of Milano and at University of Milano Bicocca (Unimib), in March 2015, she became Assistant Professor of Fundamentals of Chemical Technologies at Unimib. She is a member of PhD Council on Materials Science and Nanotechnology, PhD Program of University of Milano- Bicocca. She coordinates the activity research of PhD students of CORIMAV (Consortium for research on materials between Unimib and Pirelli) and is responsible and referent for the research activity involving Pirelli Tyre.
She has advanced background in design and development of nanocomposite, hybrid and smart materials. Her research interests are nanostructured oxides and organic-inorganic materials for environmental cleaning, and design and development of rubber composites. She co-authored more than 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 4 book chapters, 7 patents, and involved in many national and international research projects.

  • National Taiwan Ocean University , Taiwan
  • Title:Co-existence and Co-prosperity between Offshore Wind Farms and Fishermen
  • Time :10:40 - 11:05 AM

Abstract
In order to reduce carbon emissions and achieve a nuclear-free homeland, the Taiwan government revised the “Guidelines on Energy Development” in 2017 for its energy transition. By 2025, renewable energy is expected to reach 20%, with offshore wind power of 4.2 GW, an estimated power generation capacity of 14 billion kWh, and an annual carbon reduction of 7.1 million tons. However, among the 36 planned offshore wind farms in Taiwan, 21 are off the coast of Changhua. This is an important fishing ground for the coastal fishery industry and a production base for aquaculture in shallow marine water. Offshore wind farms are bound to affect the livelihood of fishermen. Therefore, through the co-existence and co-prosperity between wind farms and fishery, the conflicts in sea area utilization can be solved by marine spatial planning (MSP) and integrated coastal zone management (ICZM).
It is worth the time to think about how to use the idle sea areas between offshore wind turbines. Sea areas in wind farms may be efficiently used if marine ranches and cage culture can be planned based on the concept of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA). Therefore, on the premise of investments in cage culture, this study evaluated the marine environment, biological resources, hardware settings, legal norms, and economic feasibility of the predetermined area of Phase 1 wind power plant off the coast of Changhua, Taiwan. According to the results, round cages could help reduce the impacts of ocean currents and tides, and 16 cages placed in sea areas among four wind turbines could achieve economic scale and remarkable fishery benefits without affecting the safety of wind turbines. If fishes with high economic values are cultured in cages and species from various trophic levels, such as seaweed and shellfish, are produced, then this can reduce impacts on the overall environment and help increase the values of fishery resources, so that the sea areas for offshore wind power can be sustainably operated.
Taiwan’s coastal fishery industry is declining day by day. While wind farms are in conflict with the industry, it can be a turning point for fishermen. It is better to teach someone to fish than to give him a fish. Measures, such as proper compensation mechanisms, a friendly adjustment on fishery management, and sound fishing village development, can aid in the co-existence and co-prosperity between wind farms and fishery after energy transition.

Biography
Dr Cheng Ting Huang PhD, Department of Aquaculture , National Taiwan Ocean University, R.O.C.
Experience: Supervisor, Taiwan Fishery Economic Development Association. Secretary-general, Taiwan Fishery Sustainability Development Association. Director, Taiwan Association for Marine Environmental and Education (TAMEE).
Present Position: Associate Professor, Department of Aquaculture, National Taiwan Ocean University. Chairman, Aquatic Animal Center, Department of Aquaculture, National Taiwan Ocean University.
Field of Specialization: Economics of Aquaculture, Management of Aquaculture.
Since 2016, he has carried out more than 30 research projects, including cage aquaculture fishery, symbiosis of fishing and electricity, aquaculture economic and management, artificial intelligence techniques to implement a practical smart aquaculture management system, and published 20 research articles on aquaculture economics and management in international journals

  • V. G. Vaze College Autonomous, India
  • Title:An Eco-friendly Innovative Halide and Metal-free Basic Ionic Liquid Catalyzed Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzo [b] Pyran Derivatives in Aqueous Media: A Sustainable Protocol
  • Time :10:15 - 10:40 AM

Abstract
A novel imidazolium-based highly efficient, recoverable, and reusable basic ionic liquid [PEMIM][OH] was synthesized and employed as a catalyst for the multicomponent synthesis of tetrahydrobenzo [b] pyran derivatives by the condensation of dimedone, malononitrile and various substituted aldehydes in aqueous media. Novelty, the efficacy of the catalyst, high yields of desired products, greener approach and use of aqueous media make this protocol worthwhile. The isolation of pure, high yielded desired product by sidestepping the column and recrystallization technique was also demonstrated in this protocol. The novel catalyst and synthesized compounds were characterized by using various analytical techniques such as FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135, LC-Mass, Elemental, HSQC, HPLC, TG-DSC, TG-DTG and single crystal XRD analysis.

Biography
Dr. Paresh Suryakant More He is Associate Professor in Chemistry at The K.E.T’S, V.G.Vaze College Autonomous, His Research area Solid State in Chemistry, Material Sciences, Composite Materials , Metal Organic Framework and its application, Ferrites and its application in photo degradation, Water splitting reaction to generate H2 gas, Batteries and supercapacitors

  • Mexican Institute of Water Technology ,Mexico
  • Title:Effects of Climate Change on the Environmental Flows in the Conchos River (Chihuahua, Mexico).
  • Time :09:50 - 10:15 AM

Abstract
This study analyses the water availability in the Conchos River basin (Northern México) through the amount and frequency of the precipitation. Precipitation is associated with the environmental flows in determining how much of the flow in the river has been altered by the effects of climate change or human influence. Changes in water were determined by two precipitation periods: before (1961-1983) and after (1984-2008), using a climatological mesh database created by Center of Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada. Two periods for their differences in the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was calculated. IHA V7 program was used for the analysis of environmental flows. In the after period, there were significant increases in precipitation during the rainy season, with a substantial decrease in minimum precipitations and in the number of storms. On the other hand, during the dry season, it rained less, making the climate extreme and indicating a change in the humidity patterns. There was a total alteration of the environmental flows of the river. This aspect generated a total loss of the frequency, magnitude, duration, and periodicity of the environmental flows during the year due to the management of the dam for electricity generation, irrigation, and flood control, altering the composition, structure and function of the riparian ecosystem. However, the synergic effect of climate on the water availability was observed. Advantage of determining environmental flows is that decision-makers can know how many changes have been introduced into the river flow patterns by human consumption or by climate change.

Biography
Dr. Rebeca González Villela has a Ph.D. in Biology Sciences (Systems Ecology and Aquatic Resources) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, with studies in Spain on the Environmental Flows Calculation of Freshwater Resources (Polytechnic University of Madrid), Climate Change and Sustainable Management Watershed in Australia (Faculty of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources, University of Sydney). She has be a professor of Postgraduate Studies at various universities. She has given the chairs of Biophysics, Primary Productivity, Conservation and Recovery of Surface Water Bodies. She has been the Coordinator of the Biophysics Academy at the Faculty of Sciences (Biology in UNAM). She is currently a Researcher at the Mexican Institute of Water Technology. and has participated in numerous national and international conferences. She has published 4 books and scientific articles in national and international journals and book chapters. She is a reviewer in international Journals.

  • Forest Ecology and Management, Brazil
  • Title:Are Liming and Pit Size Determining for Tree Species Establishment in Degraded Areas by Kaolin Mining?
  • Time :

Abstract
Although its great contribution to the global economy on different scales and in the development of goods and services, mining activities usually cause strong negative impacts to the environments. They intensely degrade soil structures, watersheds, and modify landscapes. Fast-growing pioneer tree species have been effective to restore structure and functions of ecosystems degraded by mining in the Amazon. In this way, the objective of this work was to assess chemical indicators of soil quality, survival, and initial growth of six tree pioneer species planted in an ecosystem degraded by kaolin mining and under the effects of liming in three pit volumes in the Eastern Amazon, Brazil. The assessed initial conditions showed highly degraded soil, including acidic pH, low content of OM, P, and K. Liming worked to reduce significantly the level of toxic Al in the soil and provided Ca and Mg for the plants. Once applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the two first components explained 69.30% of the total variance of 13 functional indicators of soil quality. PC1 was positively correlated with Ca, Mg, K, SB, CEC, and V% and negatively correlated with H+Al, and Al saturation. The survival of planted individuals was higher than 80% for Clitoria fairchildiana in all treatments. Liming and pit volume determined growth, with high growth rates in height of Inga edulis, Inga cayennensis, Clitoria fairchildiana, and Tachigali vulgaris. The species used in this study presented good initial development in restoring ecosystems after kaolin mining.

Biography
Gustavo Schwartz – Biologist, PhD.BS in Biological Sciences at Federal University of Santa Maria (1999), MSc in Ecology at State University of Campinas (2001), both in Brazil. PhD in Forest Ecology and Management at Wageningen University (2013) in the Netherlands. Gustavo currently is researcher of Embrapa Eastern Amazon (Belém, PA, Brazil) and assistant professor in the Post-Graduate Program of Forest Sciences of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (UFRA – Campus Belém). He works in research on Ecology (Populations and Communities), Management, Silviculture, Recovering, and Conservation of Tropical Forests)

Co-Authors
Victor Pereira de Oliveira – Forest Engineer, MSc.
Walmer Bruno Rocha Martins – Forest Engineer, PhD.
Julia Isabella de Matos Rodrigues – Forest Engineer.
Arystides Resende Silva – Forest Engineer, PhD.
José do Carmo Alves Lopes – Forest Engineer, MSc.
João Fernandes de Lima Neto – Forest Engineer, MSc.

  • Continental University, Peru
  • Title:Analysis of the Influence of Solar Cycles on Meteorological Variables in the Central Inter-Andean Valley of Peru in the Period 1986–2019
  • Time :

Abstract
This research aims to analyze the relationship between solar cycles and meteorological variables in the Central Inter-Andean Valley during the period 1986–2019. Sunspot data were obtained from the Royal Observatory of Belgium for solar cycles 22, 23 and 24, and the meteorological variables of the National Service of Meteorology and Hydrology of Peru from five stations that are distributed in the Valley. For the correlation of the variables, the nonparametric Spearman statistical test with a third-degree polynomial regression was applied. The results show that there is a decrease in the number of sunspots in cycle 24, and that the temperature varies by 3.85 ◦C in the study period. Of the five stations analyzed, four of them show that there is no relation between the variables and only in the station Viques there is an inverse relation for α < 0.05 referring to the variables of maximum temperature and sunspots, obtaining a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.619. Therefore, solar activity does not influence the climate variability of the study valley, and this could be due to anthropogenic activities such as the production of energy with fossil fuels. As a recommendation we must decarbonize the energy sector and use renewable energy sources. Biography
Dr.Gonzalo Jesus Fernandez Ladera graduated from the Continental University in Peru, with interests in scientific research on climate change, renewable energy, application and development of space technologies for monitoring the Peruvian territory and many other areas that are important for sustainable development . His research was developed together with his colleagues Angie Chucos, Kiara Chihuan, Anieval Peña and Nabilt Moggiano.

  • Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania
  • Title:Increasing the Efficiency of Triangle Solar Thermal Collectors with Internal Cavity by using Turbulators with Different Shapes
  • Time :

Abstract
Sustainable energy technologies such as building integrated solar thermal systems may significantly contribute to the reduction of the greenhouse gases emissions by substituting a part of the fossil fuel used in buildings for space heating and domestic hot water preparation. Among these systems, solar thermal facades are good candidates when optimally oriented. Because the building facades are visible, the implementation of commercial solar thermal collector with rectangular shapes and dark colours may raise issues of architectural acceptance. To tackle these issues, non-rectangular (trapeze and triangle) solar thermal collectors with colored absorber plates (green, orange, red etc.) were developed in the Renewable Energy Systems and Recycling Research Centre of the Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania. The novel triangle solar thermal collector has an equilateral triangle shape, a small surface (0.06 m2) and non-dark colours (orange and green) allowing its integration in solar thermal facades with increased architectural acceptance and high coverage factor. Because of the small surface, the water circulates through an internal cavity beneath the entire absorber plate, instead of pipes as in the commercial solar thermal collectors having a significantly higher surface (around 2 m2). In the initial design of this novel solar thermal collector, a thickness of 20 mm resulted for the water layer in the internal cavity from constructive requirements. Indoor testing in standard conditions revealed color dependent efficiencies between 35 and 55%. To further increase the efficiency of the novel triangle solar thermal collector, an optimization process was developed by changing the water layer thickness and the mass flow rate. An absolute gain of 10.78% was obtained for the nominal efficiency and an average absolute gain of 10.35% over the entire range of inlet temperature by decreasing the thickness of the water layer to 5 mm while the mass flow rate was increased to
0.01 kg/s. In this paper, turbulators with various shapes installed in the internal cavity of the triangle solar thermal collector are considered to further improve its efficiency. The turbulators are modelled in SolidWorks and integrated in the 3D model of the triangle solar thermal collector. This 3D model is imported in Ansys Fluent for computational fluid dynamics simulations. The simulation results are comparatively discussed for the selected geometries of the turbulators. The influence of the shapes of the turbulators on the triangle solar thermal collector efficiency is analyzed.

Biography
Dr. Macedon Moldovan in 2013-2017 Lecturer at Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov 1997-2013 Design Engineer – Facilities for buildings, 2017-present Associate Professor at Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov, 2019-present Coordinator of the Study programme „Engineering of the Renewable Energy Systems”, Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania, 2019-present Deputy chairperson of the Technical Committee for Sustainable Energy Systems, International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science

  • Brazilian Biorenewables National Laboratory, Brazil
  • Title:Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization Associated with Vinasse and Biochar on the Dynamics of the Microbiota and N2O Emission in Soil Under Energy Cane Cultivation
  • Time :02:55 - 03:20 PM

Abstract
In the face of world pressure, the Brazilian sugar-energy sector has been optimizing and using more sustainable agricultural practices. Among them is the planting of new varieties, such as energy cane, i.e., hybrids of Saccharum spp. used for biomass production, showing higher fiber and biomass content, less edaphoclimatic requirements, and more resistance to pests and diseases. In addition to the use of these new varieties, optimizing management practices that encompass the crop production cycle, such as the use of nitrogen fertilizers by the industry, is necessary for the efficiency of the system. These fertilizers are known to be responsible for N2O emissions. Plants use less than 50% of the applied fertilizer, so at least twice as much as it is necessary to be applied for crop growth and production, and what is not absorbed remains in the soil or gets lost into the atmosphere. The reuse of agro- industrial residues also is a major differential of the sugar-energy sector because it promotes cost reduction and prevents incorrect disposal. Biochar or pyrogenic coal are also possibilities besides vinasse and straw, already widespread. In this context, we will present a study that aims to propose mainly microbiological indicators as a function of energy cane response to nitrogen fertilizer doses and application of co-products from the sugar-energy industry (vinasse and biochar) to mitigate GHG of anthropogenic origin to reduce the contribution of agriculture to global warming.

Biography
Dr. Mara Regina Moitinho Graduated in Biological Sciences at the Centro Universitário da Grande Dourados (2010), MSc in Agronomy (Soil Science) from the Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (2013), PhD in Agronomy (Soil Science) from the Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (2017), postdoctoral fellow in Agronomy (Soil Science) at the Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (2018), postdoctoral fellow in Agronomy (Soil Microbiology) at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRAE – Dijon, France) (2020), with postdoctoral studies in progress in the area of Soil Sustainability at the National Biorenovables Laboratory (LNBR), Campinas, SP. She has experience in the area of Agroecology, with an emphasis on agroforestry systems, green manure, characterization of soil CO2 and N2O emissions according to soil physical, chemical, and microbiological attributes and classical and multivariate statistics.

  • Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil
  • Title:Food Loss and Waste in the Context of the Circular Economy: a Systematic Review
  • Time :05:20 - 05:45 PM

Abstract
About 30% of food produced globally is lost or wasted along the food supply chain. In this sense, the objective of this research is to identify and systematize scientific publications relating food losses and wastes with solutions based on the concept of circular economy. Through inclusion and exclusion criteria, 40 articles were identified, until April 2020, which were analysed using the StArt tool. The papers were analysed based on the five categories selected in this study: definitions of food losses and wastes, quantification of food losses and wastes, solutions for food losses and wastes, examples of circular economy, relationship between food losses and wastes circular economy and food. The publications on the theme are from 2011, being mostly reviews until 2018 and case studies in the last two years. Developed countries, mainly European, have more publications. It is worth mentioning that there is no specific concept for food losses and wastes, which makes it difficult to quantify. The concept of circular economy is more related in terms of reduction, reuse and recycling than the idea of a systematic change in the food supply chain. The need for future studies that associate food losses and wastes with the circular economy remains a global challenge, especially for developing countries.

Biography
Dr. Mariana Martins de Oliveira has a Master’s in Agribusiness from the Federal University of Santa Maria – UFSM / Palmeira das Missões. She graduated in Environmental Engineering from the University of Vale do Itajaí-UNIVALI. She worked in the Environmental Management of the Port of Itajaí. She participated in the Agro Leadership Development Program promoted by the National Agriculture Confederation, ranking among the finalists to represent Rio Grande do Sul in the National stage in Brasília. She also participated in the Young Champions of the Earth Award promoted by the UN Environment, where her project was selected among the 50 best. By reconciling the academic area with the technical area, she provided environmental consultancy services to rural unions in the region. She is currently Coordinator of the Municipal Environment Department of the Palmeira das Missões City Hall. She is also a partner owner of TopoMen Palmeira das Missões, working in the areas of georeferencing, topography and environmental licensing. In the research she is interested in the environmental and agribusiness areas related to waste management, food loss and waste, circular economy.

  • Federal University of Pará, Brazil
  • Title:Legacies on the ground. Assessing ancient plant management in the Lower Amazon
  • Time :04:55 - 05:20 PM

Abstract
Plant management and human development are entangled in Amazonia, where landscape transformations such as cultural forests and anthrosols are associated with archaeological sites. The highly fertile Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs) are anthropogenic soils that figure as a major human footprint in Amazonian landscapes. Numerous ancient Tapajó settlements dated to the Late Pre-Columbian period (AD 1000-1600) within the Santarem region present ADEs. This paper presents the main results from an archaeobotanical study in three sites recovering a diversity of food and non-food plants through phytolith analysis in samples from domestic contexts and test pits profiles. Domesticates included maize (Zea mays), manioc (Manihot esculenta), and squash (Cucurbita sp.), whereas palms (peach palm/tucumã, açaí palm), tubers (Marantaceae) and fruit trees (Annonaceae, Burseraceae and Celtis sp.) were the main native plants recovered in samples from the three sites. These phytoliths and anthropogenic soils are addressed as legacies from past human plant consumption and assess ancient soil and vegetal management strategies.

Biography
Dr. Daiana T. Alves is currently a full-time Professor at the Federal University of Pará, Brazil. She has a BA in History (2009) and an MA in Anthropology/Archaeology (2012) from the Federal University of Pará and a PhD in Archeology (2017) from the University of Exeter (United Kingdom). She is chief editor of the Amazônica-Anthropology Journal and a member of the Society for Brazilian Archeology (SAB), Society for American Archeology (SAA) and International Phytolith Society (IPS). She leads the Research Group on Amazonian Archaeology – Tapera, investigating plants’ production and consumption in the Pre-Columbian Amazon. Her research focuses on Pre-Columbian land-uses, food production strategies and social changes in Amazonia by integrating archaeology, ethnohistory, geochemistry, and Palaeoethnobotany approaches. A particular interest is the formation of Amazonian Dark Earth anthrosols associated with late Holocene archaeological sites.

  • Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Title:Optimized Conversion of Waste Cooking Oil into Ecofriendly Bio-based Polymeric Surfactant- A Solution for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Green Fuel Compatibility
  • Time :04:30 - 04:55 PM

Abstract
Waste cooking oil (WCO) is generally considered a global waste but with prospective for secondary use such as fuels or chemicals. In the present work, functionalizing of WCO to polymeric surfactants through a cleaner approach with high emulsification ability for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of fossil crude and enhanced biocrudes solubility in petroleum crudes is proposed. The influence of synthesis conditions (temperature, time and concentration of reactants) on intermediates and the resulting polymeric surfactants was investigated. Products were characterized by UV-Vis, 1H NMR, FT-IR, and DLS technique, and particle stability and Zeta potential were evaluated. The results showed the high stability of the fossil crude-surfactant-brine emulsion. The affinity of the polymeric surfactant for EOR under Danish reservoir was also investigated. It was observed that the IFT of brine-surfactant emulsion (31.35 dynes/cm) was reduced to almost half compared to neat saline water (68.82 dynes/cm), and that the viscosity of fossil crude oil in presence of polymeric surfactant was significantly decreased. Finally, the polymeric surfactant was employed to assess compatibility of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis biocrudes with fossil refinery streams with an aim to promote their integration into existing refinery. Consequently, the correlation between compatibility and molecular structure was drawn based on the experimental investigation on miscibility studies. The results obtained during the phase behaviour and IFT studies showed the high emulsification ability of functionalized polymeric surfactant for the enhanced crude oil recovery at reservoir conditions. In conclusion, the study introduces the concept of reusing WCO as an ecofriendly polymeric surfactant for EOR and green fuel compatibility enhancer.

Biography
Dr. Kamaldeep Sharma is Postdoctoral-Fellow in advanced biofuels group at Aalborg University, Denmark. Kamaldeep received Bachelor’s, Master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Guru Nanak Dev University, India. He is a pioneer in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and has several years’ experience in catalysts synthesis for photocatalytic and catalytic conversion processes for the synthesis of value added chemicals. Additionally, he has also 2 years’ experience in hydrothermal liquefaction and catalytic upgrading of bio-oils. His recent research activities include the synthesis of catalysts from industrial wastes as well as utilization of different wastes (agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and sewage sludge) for the production of biofuels. He has published several research articles and book chapters in peer-reviewed journals of international repute. He is currently working in a couple of Danish and European Union research projects during his stay at Aalborg University. He is guest editor of a special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073) belongs to the section ‘‘Bio-Energy’’.

  • Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Russia
  • Title:Subcritical Nuclear Reactor Driven by ion Beams
  • Time :03:45 - 04:10 PM

Abstract
The performance of subcritical nuclear reactors driven by proton and ion beams (accelerator driven system- ADS) is analyzed and the advantage of ion beams is substantiated. The conditions which maximize the power production and the energy gain G (defined as the ratio of the power produced to the power spent for the beam acceleration), ensuring in the same time a safe exploitation are identified.
With a proper choice of the target G of 20-30 can be obtained.
The particle fluence and the energy released are obtained through simulation with Geant4. The power spent to accelerate the beam is calculated by scaling from the data about the accelerator efficiency for a reference particle.
Cylindrical targets with rods of solid fuel (metallic alloy, oxide, carbide) in a bath of coolant are considered. The most significant influence on the energy released demonstrates the material used for the converter. The use of light materials increases the energy released especially for light ions at low energy. The best results are obtained with Be converter with length 100-120 cm.
The value of the criticality coefficient keff must be chosen as high as possible to maximize the power produced, but low enough to ensure a safe functioning of the reactor. The reactivity changes during various accident scenarios were analyzed in order to identify possible positive reactivity insertions. A value of 0.985 for keff ensures enough safety margin.
The results obtained with protons and ions beams from deuteron to 20Ne and energies from
0.2 to 2 AGeV, accelerated in a linac and interacting in U-Pu-Zr target with Be converter and keff 0.985 are presented. The beam intensity is 1.25‧1016, and the linac efficiency 0.18 for protons (values taken from the European Spallation Source project).
The optimal energy for proton is 1.5 GeV, with a G of 10 and net power Pnet of 150 MW. G 2-3 times higher can be realized with ion beams. With a beam of 7Li with energy 0.25 AGeV one gets the same Pnet but with G of 18, and necessitates an accelerator 2.6 times shorter. At intermediate accelerator length beams of Li or Be are the best option (G 20-25, Pnet 350-400 MW). In an accelerator with the same length as for 1.5 GeV proton it is preferable to accelerate ions with higher mass (12C, 16O, 20Ne) getting a G~ 30 and Pnet~1 GW.

Biography
Dr. Mihaela Paraipan has completed her PhD from Politechnica University Bucharest, Romania.
She is working in present as senior researcher at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna , and she has more than 20 articles in peer reviewed journals.

  • University of Rennes,France
  • Title:Improvement of Fermentation From Hydrolysate of Green Macroalgae for Bioethanol Production on a Lab- Scale and on a Pilot-Scale
  • Time :03:20 - 03:45 PM

Abstract
The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of ethanol bioproduction from hydrolysate of macroalgea. Firstly, experiments were carried out with a synthetic medium adjusted on algal hydrolysate composition with four yeast strains: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Kluyveromyces marxianus. Nitrogen source, inoculum size and salt contents were examined.
Secondly, the study focused on the fermentation of hydrolysate from the green macroalgae Ulva rigida, confirming the possibility of converting algal hydrolysate into bioethanol, without nitrogen enrichment and sterilization. It was observed that pH regulation and aeration were not essential for the ethanol production. In these conditions, the experiment gave a concentration of 12 g L-1 and the conversion rate of glucose into bioethanol reached 82%. For the lab-scale assays, the media volume varied between 250 to 1 500 mL.
Finally, the scale up process was examined on a pilot scale (77 L) using S. cerevisiae growing on a hydrolysate of Chaetomorpha sp. This experiment gave a concentration of 5.6 g L-1 (lower than the results obtained during previous tests because of the limited hydrolysis yield), but with an efficiency of 97%.

Biography
Dr. Hayet DJELAL is Associate Professor at UniLasalle-Ecole des Métiers de l’Environnement, France. Her main research activities are related to Bioprocess Engineering, particularly chemical and bioprocesses development, development of elimination of micropollutants and biotreatment of industrial wastewater. She also works on aerobic and anaerobic fermentation technologies.
She supervised 7 PhD thesis concluded and 3 others are in progress, as well as more than 10 Master students. She has published 55 articles in scientific international journals with peer reviewing and she is associate editor of one scientific journal. She participated and coordinated several scientific projects with external financial support and she is implicated in national and international collaborations as Mexico, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon …

  • Federal Technological University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:Quality Reference Values for Heavy Metals In Soils Developed from Basic Rocks under Tropical Conditions.
  • Time :02:30 - 02:55 PM

Abstract
Soil Quality Reference Values (QRV) refer to the natural heavy metal concentrations that is not influenced or is minimally influenced by anthropogenic activities. Such values are unique of each environment, and their extrapolation to different locations becomes inadequate. This research aimed to determine the natural concentrations of metals in soils (QRV) developed on essentially basaltic lithology and tropical conditions in the south of Brazil. Seventy-two soil samples from the Forest Conservation Areas in the west of the state of Paraná, Brazil, were obtained. The extraction and dosage of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were carried out employing methods USEPA 3051a and ICP-OES. The QRV was set to 75th percentile of each element, from the detection and exclusion of the outliers. The natural concentration of all heavy metals was related to the geological context of the basaltic area in Brazil. There was no influence of the pedogenetic degree of soils on the natural heavy metal concentration. The only relevant process for reducing the natural heavy metal levels was the Fe and Mn oxide solubility promoted by hydromorphic conditions. Fe oxides had a significant role in the maintenance of structural and adsorbed heavy metal forms in soils. The results may help the research and monitoring of environmental heavy metals in soils developed from basalt under tropical conditions.

Biography
Dr. Juliane Maria Bergamin Bocardi has doctorate in Applied Chemistry, with an emphasis on Environmental Chemistry, from the State University of the Midwest, Paraná, Brazil (UNICENTRO). She has master’s degree in Applied Chemistry with an emphasis on Natural Products from the State University of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil (UEPG) and a degree in Chemistry from the State University of Western Paraná (UNIOESTE). She is currently Chemistry professor in the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Brazil, campus Medianeira (UTFPR). Develops activities in the areas of Environmental Chemistry such as environmental monitoring and control.

  • Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, Iran
  • Title:GIS-based Ensemble Computational Models for Flood Susceptibility Prediction in the Quang Binh Province, Vietnam
  • Time :02:05 - 02:30 PM

Abstract
Recently, floods are occurring more frequently every year around the world due to increased anthropogenic activities and climate change. There is a need to develop accurate models for flood susceptibility prediction and mapping, which can be helpful in developing more efficient flood management plans. In this study, the Partial Decision Tree (PART) classifier and the AdaBoost, Bagging, Dagging, and Random Subspace ensembles learning techniques were combined to develop novel GIS-based ensemble computational models (ABPART, BPART, DPART and RSSPART) for flood susceptibility mapping in the Quang Binh Province, Vietnam. In total, 351 flood locations were used in the model study. This data was divided into a 70:30 ratio for model training (70% ≅ 255 locations) and (30% ≅ 96 locations) for model validation. Ten flood influencing factors, namely elevation, slope, curvature, flow direction, flow accumulation, river density, distance from river, rainfall, land-use, and geology, were used for the development of models. The OneR feature selection method was used to select and prioritize important factors for the spatial modeling. The results revealed that land-use, geology, and slope are the most important conditioning factors in the occurrence of floods in the study area. Standard statistical methods, including the ROC curve (AUC), were used for the performance evaluation of models. Results indicated that the performance of all models was good (AUC > 0.9) and RSSPART (AUC = 0.959) outperformed the others. Thus, the RSSPART model can be used for accurately predicting and mapping flood susceptibility.
Biography
Dr. Mahdis Amiri, She is 27 years old, also her date of birth is May 16, 1994, Her Place of Birth is Shiraz, currently she is PhD student at Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Department of Watershed & Arid Zone Management, Gorgan, Iran. She in the sixth semester. She hold a Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from the University of Shiraz. Her majors are Natural resource, Her master’s thesis title is Spatial Modeling of Gully Erosion and. She is currently working on Spatial modeling and multi-hazards. Also, She is very interested in Spatial Modelling of Gully erosion, Landslide, Fire Forest and Flood susceptibility also groundwater potential.

  • Kyoto University, Japan
  • Title:Long-term Nationwide Spatiotemporal Changes and Trends of Freshwater Temperature in Japan (1982–2016)
  • Time :12:40 - 01:05 PM

Abstract
If the present rates of biodiversity loss continue, projections suggest that within 240 years Earth may face its sixth mass extinction. Because many fishes and amphibians, as well as crustaceans, mollusks, and other aquatic macroinvertebrates, are ectotherms, temperature is an important component of water quality that directly affects their growth rate and distribution Freshwater temperature is a physical water quality parameter of critical importance, and understanding the trends in freshwater temperature is important for identifying potential threats to the biodiversity of aquatic ecosystems.
We analyzed freshwater temperature data (based on “The Water Quality Survey of Public Water Areas” of the Ministry of the Environment) from 1982 to 2016 throughout Japan to better understand how waters are warming in Japan.
We used linear regression to determine the temperature change rate and Mann-Kendall tests to identify significant temporal trends in the annual maximum and mean temperatures. Among 11,240 monitoring sites screened, 159 with fewer missing values were selected for analysis.
On the basis of this analysis, we identified and ranked the sites showing significant temporal increasing or decreasing trends for future management. At nearly half (42%) of the analyzed sites, the annual mean freshwater temperature was increasing; thus, in the future, adverse impacts from warm temperatures may increase in those aquatic ecosystems. The temperature change rate of fresh water was higher than that of air, indicating that the observed increases in freshwater temperature were not due to atmospheric warming only. Among individual sites, the annual maximum freshwater temperature change rate ranged from -1.27 to 1.91 °C/decade, and the annual mean rate ranged from -1.13 to 1.28 °C/decade. Few other studies have reported decreasing temperatures for fresh water.
We expect our results will improve understanding of how freshwater temperatures are changing at a large scale, enhance understanding of human impacts on the aquatic environment, support effective management of ecosystems experiencing temperature changes, and help to minimize the loss of biodiversity over the next half century.
(Keywords: Air temperature, Freshwater temperature, Global warming, Japan, Spatiotemporal analysis, GIS.)
Biography
Dr. Satoshi Kameyama is a Senior Chief Researcher at Biodiversity Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies; JAPAN. He is a Specially Appointed Professor at The Kyoto University (Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research) and a lecturer at The University of Tokyo (The Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Science) in 2018. He is also working as visiting lecturer at VNU (Vietnam Japan University) in Vietnam National University. He received Ph.D. degrees from The Graduate School of Agriculture from The Hokkaido University in 1999. He is an editorial board member of The Remote Sensing Society of Japan from 2011. He is also a member of American Geophysical Union, American Fisheries Society, The Ecological Society of Japan, The Japanese Alpine Club etc. The main research topics of recent years are “Evaluation of ecosystem functions and services and their sustainable use” and “Watershed ecosystem restoration based on the recovery of migration pass and diadromous fish habitat using Environmental DNA” etc. The final goal (the dream) of his research is to realize sustainable regional community with high resilience to climate change harmonizing with nature.

  • Pusan National University , Republic of Korea
  • Title:Vertically Aligned CoMoS Nanosheet on PANI Nanowire as an Excellent Electrocatalysts for Water Splitting
  • Time :12:15 - 12:40 PM

Abstract
To achieve an efficient conversion of renewable energy sources through water splitting, low-cost, efficient, and eco-friendly catalysts are required for oxygen and hydrogen evolution. Here, we develop a vertically aligned cobalt molybdenum sulfide (CoMoS) nanosheets on a conductive polyaniline (PANI) nanowire on nickel foam (NF) by a one-step solvothermal synthesis. The macroporous nickel foam improve the carry of the O2 gas evolved, and vertically aligned CoMoS nanosheets on a three-dimensional PANI nanowire substrate form a hybrid architecture, promoting electrolyte penetration and the removal of gas bubbles, enabling firm touch between reactants and active sites, and generating smooth pathways for effective charge transport in the conductive channels. The hybrid CoMoS-PANI requires only 250 and 98 mV, to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm–2 in 1 M KOH, for the oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions, respectively. As an electrode for overall water splitting, CoMoS-PANI/NF, as both the anode and the cathode, shows a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a low cell voltage, 1.58 V. Moreover, it possessed excellent durability during the 50 h stability test, suggests that CoMoS-PANI is an efficient and stable bifunctional catalyst. The upgraded electrocatalytic activity of CoMoS-PANI can be attributed to the synergistic interaction between Co, Mo, S, and PANI. First, the CoMoS nanosheets were grown on conductive PANI nanowire substrate as hybrid architectures, encouraging electrolyte piercing and the removal of gases, enabling strong contact between and reactants and active sites, and creating a smooth pathway for effective charge transportion. Second, the defect rich structure, S vacancies centered in the CoMoS nanosheet structure, and amines in the PANI nanowire create a high electrochemically active surface area and a large number of active sites, expose active interfaces, and maintain the conductivity. Finally, the effective inter-electron transfer between cobalt and molybdenum and the intra-electron transfer between PANI and CoMoS reduce the kinetic energy barrier of initial water dissociation and ion adsorption. Thus, these factors resulted in excellent augmented performance for OER, HER, and overall water splitting. This work creates a promising step towards the synthesis of hybrid materials as excellent electrocatalysts for renewable energy generation.

Biography
Dr. Sobin Mathew is Ph.D research fellow in Pusan National University, Division of Material science and engineering
Topics : Hybrid Materials, Water splitting, Electrochemistry, Hydrogen Fuel Cell.

  • State University of Londrina, Brazil
  • Title:Urban Watershed Management Prioritization Using the Rapid Impact Assement Matrix (RIAM-UWMAP), GIS and Field Survey
  • Time :11:50 - 12:15 AM

Abstract
A badly planned and not sustainable urban growth can be the source of a series of environmental impacts. In Brazil, conventional urbanization processes have caused several environmental impacts such as water pollution, clandestine sewage or effluent discharge, floods, erosions, illegal solid waste disposal, damaged drainage structures with disconneted parts and landslides. An interesting possibility for sustainable urban planning are urban watersheds with a certain scales of prioritization. In the specialized literature, the watershed prioritization is discussed mostly for computational methods and models, not including the importance of field survey and headwater analysis, since most urban rivers are considered as headwaters (order 1). The aim of this work was to integrate on a GIS environment data of basin morphology (QSWAT+ tool with SRTM data), pedology (ITCG), land cover and use (MapBiomas) and the field survey data of vegetation, erosion, drainage infrastructure and the presence of solid waste and wastewater of the watersheds through the Rapid Impact Assessment Matrix (RIAM) analysis, what we called RIAM-UWMAP to compare natural characteristics and urbanization to further create a prioritization order for management. The study occured in 27 urban headwaters within 8 watersheds of a medium size city in the North’s of Paraná State in Brazil. Results showed that poorly managed vegetation, drainage structures problems and conventional urbanization were the main variables that generate higher levels of prioritization (lowest value of the environmental score – es, urgent interventions). The examples are headwaters 2b (es = -390), 3b (es = -330), 4a (es = -354), 5b (es = -346) and 5c (es = -322). The positives “es” occured in locations where the sorroundings were primarily rural activities. In another words, places where urbanization was not implemented yet are an opportunity to be sustainable planned. The RIAM-UWMAP is an excellent tool for environmental diagnostic showing problems that cannot be seen through digital data and also give direction to municipal decision makers to allocate financial resources and faster interventions to points of urgency, avoiding the waste of time and money in locations where management was no necessarily urgent.

Biography
Dr. Marcos Vinicius Costa Rodrigues is a environmental engineer with masters in civil engineering focused on urban watersheds and environment impact assessment and environmental management. Professional with 6 years of experience in urban and environmental planning as project coordinator to cities within 10.000 to 150.000 inhabitants (afforestation, solid waste, wastewater, sewage, hydric resources, air pollution, sanitation, georeferencing) and 4 years experience in organic effluent treatment.

Co-Authors
Diego Vila Guimarães. Department of Geography. State University of Londrina.
Renan Borelli Galvão. Department of Civil Engineering, State University of Londrina.
Ellen Patrick. Deparment of Environmental Engineering. Dalhousie University.
Fernando Fernandes. Graduato Program in Civil Engineering. State University of Londrina.

  • University Of Concepcion, Chile
  • Title:Gas Extraction Hood Modeling in a Steel Converter for Energy Recovery Using Phase Change Materials
  • Time :11:25 - 11:50 AM

Abstract
The steel industry is characterized by its energy-intensive processes. The steel forming process stands out, where the oxidation of carbon, when reacting, generates incomplete combustion gases at high temperature through the process basic oxygen injection in the furnace (BOF). A model of intermittent process and high temperature gas collection system is proposed and validated through experimental measurements. Through it, energy improvement opportunities are analyzed, highlighting energy recovery from high temperature flue gases by incorporating a phase change material (PCM) method for temporary energy storage. It was estimated that the fumes inside the hood could provide 77 GJ of available energy during the 15 min of oxygen injection (blowdown). With the use of a PCM device, between 13% and 32% residual energy recovery is obtained, equivalent to 10–25 GJ. In this way, a continuous heat flow could be generated during the whole process for steam generation through a cooling system in the gas collection system, with an electricity generation potential with a Rankine cycle of 14.5 MW.

Biography
Dr. Roberto Ramirez is a Professor and researcher at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the Universidad de Concepción. He his Mechanical Engineer by profession and a teacher at heart. He consider myself a persevering, responsible and daring person, He always see challenges as an opportunity to grow. This is his first publication, which has been presented at national congresses of mechanical engineering students and Iberoamerican congress of mechanical engineering. He his currently working on energy projects at the community level and teaching pryects at the university level. His passionate about teaching because he believe it is the way to change the world and his faithfully believe that his students are capable of achieving change in the environmental paradigm. And He his looking for a doctorate in order to expand my knowledge and profession.

  • University of Oslo, Norway
  • Title:Establishing Empirical Models for Predicting Forest Carbon Uptake Using Seven Environmental Drivers
  • Time :10:40 - 11:05 AM

Abstract
Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) of forests is the net carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes between land and the atmosphere due to forests’ biogeochemical processes. NEP varies with natural drivers such as precipitation, air temperature, solar radiation, plant functional type (PFT), and soil texture, which affect the gross primary production and ecosystem respiration, and thus the net C sequestration. It is also known that deposition of sulphur and nitrogen influences NEP in forest ecosystems. These drivers’ respective, unique effects on NEP, however, are often difficult to be individually identified by conventional bivariate analysis. Here we show that by analyzing 22 forest sites with 231 site-year data acquired from FLUXNET database across Europe for the years 2000-2014, the individual, unique effects of these drivers on annual forest CO2 fluxes can be disentangled using Generalized Additive Models (GAM) for nonlinear regression analysis. We show that S and N deposition have substantial impacts on NEP, where S deposition above 5 kg S ha-1 yr-1 can significantly reduce NEP, and N deposition around 22 kg N ha-1 yr-1 has the highest positive effect on NEP. Our results suggest that air quality management of S and N is crucial for maintaining healthy biogeochemical functions of forests to mitigate climate change. Furthermore, the empirical models we developed for estimating NEP of forests can serve as a forest management tool in the context of climate change mitigation. Potential applications include the assessment of forest carbon fluxes in the REDD+ framework of the UNFCCC.

Biography
Dr.You Ren Wang was born in Taipei, Taiwan. He received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Physics from National Taiwan University and Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, US. His research field was experimental astroparticle physics (neutrino). Later he changed his field from physics to environmental sciences, believing it is closer to the real world. His particular interested in the research related to climate change. He his now a postdoc researcher in Centre for Biogeochemistry in the Anthropocene, University of Oslo. The study he just finished was to disentangle effects of natural and anthropogenic drivers on forest carbon uptake, using in-situ measured FLUXNET data, modelled sulphur and nitrogen deposition data, and GAM regression technique. Another ongoing study is to evaluate global and regional land surface temperature rate of change in the past decades, using MODIS remote sensing data and ERA5-Land reanalysis data with fine resolution and global coverage.

  • Mining and Metallurgy Institute Bor , Serbia
  • Title:Interstitial Water in Tailings as a Source of Groundwater Pollution in The Bor Mining Area, Eastern Serbia
  • Time :10:15 - 10:40 AM

Abstract
The exploitation of porphyry copper deposits has been carried out for about 120 years in Eastern Serbia. Mining activities have led to serious environmental problems, the most notable being air pollution and surface water pollution. However, the effects of long-time pollution on groundwater in the Bor mining area have not been clarified. This study defined the existence of groundwater pollution along the banks of polluted rivers and the mechanism of pollutants infiltration into groundwater. Groundwater samples were collected in settlements along Bor River and Bela River polluted by mining activities, located downstream of the Bor mine. To understand the background concentrations of elements in the groundwater of the study area, groundwater samples were collected outside the mining area.
Natural water in Eastern Serbia contains high bicarbonate concentrations, which gives a good buffering capacity and near-neutral pH values to groundwater in the study area. These conditions prevent pollution by heavy metals. However, high concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42-, which are aqueous species and they can be present in a near-neutral solution, are found in groundwater along rivers polluted by mining activities. Concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42- in groundwater collected within 100 m from the polluted rivers range up to 511 mg/L and 1111 mg/L, respectively. The actual concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42- exceeded the maximum admissible value described by Serbian standard for drinking water making groundwater located near polluted river banks unsafe for drinking purposes. To investigate the possibility of groundwater pollution by interstitial water in tailings deposited on the floodplains of rivers downstream of the Bor mine and pollution by direct infiltration of polluted river water into groundwater, the chemical composition of pore water and polluted river water was determined. Using mixing analysis, it has been established that the mechanism of groundwater pollution is the infiltration of interstitial water in tailings along the banks of polluted rivers into groundwater. Mixing between interstitial water in tailings and groundwater may be possible in the rainy season and snow-melting season when water from the surface can percolate into the aquifer. This study also showed that Ca2+ and SO42- are suitable components for the environmental evaluation of groundwater in mining areas in Eastern Serbia.

Biography
Dr Dragana Adamović works in the Mining and Metallurgy Institute Bor (Serbia) as a Research Associate in the instrumental analysis department. Working and leaving in a mining area, she put great interest in environmental protection. In 2018, she received a scholarship from the Government of Japan and continues her education at Akita University. Since then, she has been actively involved in the problems related to surface water and groundwater pollution by mining activities in eastern Serbia. In 2021, she obtained PhD degree. She has published several papers in peer-reviewed journals. The subject of this presentation is groundwater pollution in Eastern Serbia.

  • Center for Environmental Measurement and Modeling, USA
  • Title:Life Cycle Assessment of Environmental Impact by Disposable Drinking Straws: A Trade-off Analysis with Marine Litter
  • Time :09:50 - 10:15 AM

Abstract
Sound environmental management to control marine plastic pollution requires a careful assessment of environmental costs and benefits of replacing single-use plastics with their biodegradable counterparts. This research employs the standard life cycle assessment (LCA) approach to assess and compare the environmental impact of plastic straws made from polypropylene (PP), and its biodegradable alternatives made from polylactic acid (PLA) and paper (PA) in the United States. Eight environmental impact categories, not including marine litter, were analyzed and a composite relative environmental impact index (REI) was derived for quantitative comparison. The results show that US daily consumption of disposable drinking straws (500 million straws daily) may carry significant environmental burdens regardless of straw types, with the feedstock manufacture stage of the life cycle creating most of the contribution. The REI index values were 2.4 for PP straws, 6.4 for PLA straws, and 5.1 for PA straws with landfill and 3.2 for PP straws, 6.8 for PLA straws, and 4.9 for PA straws with incineration. A sensitivity analysis did not show much change in REI with increasing marine litter rate, demonstrating that replacing PP straws with PLA or PA straws for controlling marine plastic pollution would come with environmental costs in other categories. The trade-off can be quantitatively represented by the difference in REI between PP straws and PA or PLA straws. Our analysis also indicates close-loop recycling can reduce the environmental impact of PP straws, serving as a technological development to control plastic pollution. While disposable straws were used as a case study in this work, the findings are extensive to other single-use products. Focused data collection programs are strongly needed for future LCA studies to establish a quantitative relationship between marine litter rate, fate and transport of plastic debris in the marine environment, and the extent to which a species’ population may be affected.

Biography
Dr. Yongshan Wan is a supervisory environmental engineer at the Center for Environmental Measurement and Modeling, US EPA. In this role, he leads a vibrant research team, conducting independent and collaborative research dealing with environmental issues of national significance such as coastal pollution by nutrients and plastics, harmful algal blooms, and heavy metal contamination. The technical approach employed by his team integrates molecular techniques, instrumental analysis, sensor-based data acquisition, and environmental modeling. Dr. Wan is an author of over 120 peer-reviewed publications.

  • University of Magallanes, Chile
  • Title:Status of Atlantic Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Aquaculture Production Technology in Chile
  • Time :09:25 - 09:50 AM

Abstract
The European aquaculture industry began to undertake Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) aquaculture in the 1980s due to the favorable growth rate and high market value of this cold-water marine fish. Atlantic halibut cultivation began in Chile in 1996 in the Magallanes region (53 ̊S). Chilean aquaculture facilities were finally equipped to begin rearing Atlantic halibut after 12 years and a total investment of $ 2 million USD. Infrastructure is now in place to manage the entire production cycle, including broodstock rearing, egg incubation, larval rearing (yolk-sac stage, first-feeding), weaning, the nursery stage, on-growing in land-based tanks, harvest, and marketing. The hatchery phase to produce 10-g juveniles requires 10–12 months, followed by an approximately 30-month grow-out phase in land-based tanks to produce 3-kg fish. Further research and development are being performed in nutrition (diet formulation), genetics (selection for disease resistance and growth rate), fish health, and environmental issues to support the development of a sustainable marine aquaculture industry for this species.

Biography
Dr. Pablo Gallardo Ojeda currently an Associate Professor at the University of Magallanes, Director of the Department of Agricultural and Aquacultural Sciences, Director of the Bahía Laredo Marine Research Center and Institutional Representative to FONDEF-ANID. During his professional development (24 years) he have formulated, directed and participated in almost thirty Aquaculture R&D projects, both for fish, mollusks, algae, echinoderms and crustaceans, directing work groups, both professionally and support and leveraging nearly US$ 5 million in pecuniary resources from competitive funds. he have participated in 19 publications and 9 scientific congresses, in Chile and abroad. Annually, he teach 6 level subjects; technical, undergraduate and postgraduate and he have directed 14 theses and professional practices of students of Marine Biology, Aquaculture Engineering and Aquatic Resources Technicians. In addition, he participate in the Technical Scientific Committee for Land Management of Aquaculture and the Recreational Fishing Committee of the Magallanes region, both belonging to the Undersecretary of Fisheries and Aquaculture of Chile Government and the Ethics Committee of the University of Magallanes.

  • State University of Londrina, Brazil
  • Title:Methane Production Using a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor dor Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste and Swine Manure With Different Volumetric Organic Load
  • Time :

Abstract
A poorly solid waste management (SWM), speacilly in developing countries, not only cause degradation to the environment but also public health challenges. These challenges might be an opportunity for a country as Brazil for the use of organic solid waste (OSW) to produce energy within a generated distribution system. However, the variation between the quantities and characteristics of the OSW is a key factor for the energy production. The aims of this work was to evaluate the methane production of a 40m3 anaerobic reactor using three OSW in different periods, from university’s restaurant (UR) and hospital (UH – only food waste) and swine manure (SM); find the consequences into the system due the volumetric organic load (VOL) variation; and analyze the control parameters when the organic load was momentanium interrupted. A continuous stirred-tank reactor – CSTR, was used in a semi-continuos operation – controlled temperature of 36 ºC (±2ºC); intermittent mechanical agitation – 10 minutes agitation in intervals of 6 hours; over 278 days in 6 hydraulic retention time (HRT 1 to 6) of 40 days each – with 3 three times a week of loading – there was also a start-up period of 18 days and 20 days of momentanium load interruption. Results showed that the VOL varied from 0.14 (HRT 4 – SM) to 2.50 kgVS.m-3.d-1 (HRT 3 – UR), with a global VOL (medium for the whole operation period) of 0.5 kgVS.m-3.d-1; the highest specific methane yield (SMY) was 0.62 m3CH4.kgVS-1 (SM) and medium VOL of 0.19 kgVS.m-3.d-1, both for HRT 4; On the biogas, the methane content (MC) varied from 54,6% (start-up) to 66,6% (HRT 4 – SM) with global value of 60,4%; and the better convertion of SW to biogas was to UR, with 75.0%, both forthe start-up and HRT 1 of VS. At the interruption period, the biogas production was reduced in 81.6% but the methane content average was 64.9%. In conclusion, the studied CSTR kept a good methane production even with the variations of VOL and the interruption. This reactor has positive potential under proper operation for the its use to produce methane and provide it for energy production beyond the appropriate organic solid waste treatment.

Biography
Dr. Marcos Vinicius Costa Rodrigues is a environmental engineer with masters in civil engineering focused on urban watersheds and environment impact assessment and environmental management. Professional with 6 years of experience in urban and environmental planning as project coordinator to cities within 10.000 to 150.000 inhabitants (afforestation, solid waste, wastewater, sewage, hydric resources, air pollution, sanitation, georeferencing) and 4 years experience in organic effluent treatment.

Co-Authors
Mauricio Aparecido Bortoloti. Department of Civil Engineering, State University of Londrina.
Adriana Zeminiani Challiol. Department of Civil Engineering, State University of Londrina.
Isabela Mangerino Sicchieri. Department of Civil Engineering, State University of Londrina.
Thainara Camila Fernandes de Quadrdos. Department of Civil Engineering, State University of Londrina.
Emília Kiyomi Kuroda. Graduate Program in Civil Engineering. State University of Londrina.
Fernando Fernandes. Graduate Program in Civil Engineering. State University of Londrina.

  • Federal Institute of Education, Brazil
  • Title:Water use Efficiency by Castor Oil Plant Under Semi-arid Conditions of Brazil 
  • Time :

Abstract
Castor bean is one of the main and promising agricultural crops for the production of biodiesel, castor oil and castor bean cake, which have high added value, especially the oil. Although castor bean is a crop known as relatively tolerant to drought, the production is reduced after long periods of droughts, frequent in the semi-arid region of Brazil. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the water use efficiency (WUE) of castor bean cultivars by assessing the soil water balance components (storage and water storage variation; internal drainage; capillary rise; irrigation depth; rainfall and actual evapotranspiration), gas exchange and morphoagronomic characters. These works have been carried out from 2018 to the present. Castor bean cultivars with supplemental irrigation at a rate of 8 L day-1. Soil water storage was lower for the most productive castor bean cultivar (EBDA MPA 11), with an inverse relationship between yield and water storage, due to its water requirement. The highest and lowest values of internal drainage and capillary rise were found for BRS Nordestina and IAC 226, respectively. EBDA MPA 11 had the best water use efficiency among the castor bean cultivars. In the works currently developed, we work an ideal environment maintained with in irrigation of 8 L day-1 and in the environment with water deficit, an irrigation of 2.4 L day-1. The castor bean cultivars were evaluated for morphoagronomic traits for the estimation of genetic parameters, stability and adaptability (GGE Biplot) and was possible to investigate the percentage of productivity loss between the cultivars when comparing the two contrasting water environments. Losses ranged from 48% for the cultivar with the lowest WUE to 6% for the cultivar with the highest WUE. The cultivars that stood out as most adapted to and stable under water deficit were EBDA MPA11, EBDA MPB35, EBDA MPB34 and IAC 2028. It is worth mentioning that the same cultivars were evaluated to aim at check the behavior of gas exchange in a contrasting water environment. In the initial of analysis of the results, a relationship between the results of the morphoagronomic data and the results obtained for the characteristics obtained by the photosynthesis analyzer was observed. In this work, the parameters of physiological as WUEf (Net assimilation rate/transpiration rate), WUEa (Production/actual evapotranspiration), yield, transpiration rate and gas exchages were measured. In the early inferences, cultivars IAC 226 and EBDA17 stood out with the best results for the gas exchange data. These results will support the understanding of soil-plant-atmosphere dynamics to be used in castor bean crops in the semi-arid region of Bahia and tools for the castor bean breeding program at IF Baiano for the selection of genotypes with high water use efficiency.

Biography
Dr. Leandro Santos Peixouto is graduated in Agronomic Engineering from UFRB (2007), master’s degree (2009) and doctorate (2013) in Genetics and Plant Breeding from UFLA. He has experience in agronomy, plant genetic improvement, experimentation and statistical analysis by the R. Professor since 2010 at the Instituto Federal Baiano, Campus Guanambi. He is currently developing research in plant improvement of the castor bean crop to develop cultivars for the semi-arid region of Bahia.

Co-Authors
Alexsandro dos Santos Brito, Instituto Federal Baiano, Campus Guanambi – Doctor in Soil Physics;
Yslai Silva Peixouto, Doctoral Student in Genetics and Molecular Biology – UESC;
Darley de Araujo Nascimento, Mastering in Soils and Plant Nutrition – ESALQ/USP.

  • Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology , India
  • Title:Aerosol Characteristics Over the Indian Summer Monsoon Region: Spatial Heterogeneity and its Climatic Implications
  • Time :

Abstract
The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region, comprises the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) in the northern part of India, is dominated by the enhanced loading of anthropogenic aerosol pollution and thus considered as one of the global hotspots. It is one such region, where heterogeneity in aerosol optical and microphysical properties over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales continues to hinder in improving the estimates of aerosol-induced climate forcing. Rapid increase in population and urbanization has resulted in excessive fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning leading to high anthropogenic aerosol loading over this region. The large increase in anthropogenic aerosols over the IGB is hypothesized to cause considerable changes in regional monsoonal circulation and also the global climate system apart from the aerosol-induced negative health impacts. The recent worldwide lockdown, imposed due to current pandemic of coronavirus lead to lower the emissions from various anthropogenic sources across the world, including India by restricting various community mobilities like traffic, construction and industrial activities. This resulted an improved air quality at highly polluted regions, like IGB. However, these reductions are temporary, and may not have any long-term impact on global climate change but may affect the seasonal monsoon activities in India. The current situation can be seen as positive to put forward our efforts to improve the levels of various air pollutants in our ambient air and the impact of different emission sources on its level, and also towards our research more on green energy.

Biography
Dr. Atul Kumar Srivastava received his M. Sc. (Tech.) degree from the Department of Geophysics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, and Ph.D. from Pune University, Pune, India. He worked as Postdoctoral Fellow at ARIES, Nainital, India during Aug 2007-May 2008. He joined the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, New Delhi, India in June 2008 and presently working as Scientist-E. His main research interests are to understand and quantify aerosol characteristics and their direct and indirect climatic implications through measurements and modelling. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed research papers (with total citation: 4000 and h-index: 37 as per google scholar). Also, Published 05 Book Chapters. He has received the Best Paper Award during TROPMET-2012 and IASTA-2018. He has been nominated for the INSA medal for Young Scientist in 2012-2013. He has received prestigious Humboldt Fellowship for working visit at TROPOS, Germany in 2015. Also, received FinCEAL Plus BRIDGES Asia Research Award for Visiting Scientist at FMI, Finland in 2019.

  • University of Tocantins, Brazil
  • Title:Soy Water Footprint and Socioeconomic Development: an Analysis in the new Agricultural Expansion Areas of the Brazilian Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna)
  • Time :

Abstract
The relationship between the Water Footprint (WF) of soy production and the socioeconomic development of the municipalities located in the recent agricultural expansion areas of the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna), between 2007 and 2016 was to verify in this study. For this purpose, the development of soy producing and non-producing municipalities was compared, according to different categories of consolidation time and economic weight of this culture, through multivariate analysis. The correlation between the development index and the absolute WF was calculated. The results found refute the hypothesis that the development of producing municipalities is a reflection of the economic advances provided by the soybean producer in these areas. Those who have consolidated their soy production for over 30 years are the ones that showed the best overall development, but not the best health sub-indicators. However, they did not show good results in the distribution of income and employment creation. The size of the areas destined to the cultivation of this conmodity is associated to local climate changes that put productive and environmental sustainability at risk, since, for each unit of growth of the municipal development indicator, water consumption increased 17 times and it was found the water footprint of soybeans is inversely linked to the municipal development index.

Biography
Dr. Líliana Pena Naval is a biologist, interested in the conservation of water resources, using effluent reuse as
a management tool. her work addresses such as effluent reuse, water footprint and social
technologies for effluent treatment. In her work, she apply laboratory experiments and modeling approaches.
She have a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and
a Post-Doctorate in Sciences IPEN (Energy Research Institute)/University of São Paulo
(USP). she have developed projects in the area of Environmental Sciences, with an emphasis
on environmental sanitation, working mainly on the topic of effluent reuse. she work as a
professor at the Federal University of Tocantins (UFT/Brazil). She is a professor at the
Federal University of Tocantins, Northern Brazil (Amazon region).

  • Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan
  • Title:The Epidemiology of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Japan: Findings from a Nationwide Multi-Center Survey
  • Time :02:15 - 02:30 PM

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the current epidemiology of DDH using a comprehensive nationwide survey in Japan. A questionnaire was sent to orthopedic surgeons in 1,987 facilities nationwide. A total of 783 (39%) facilities completed and returned the card of DDH. Of these, 79% reported no cases of DDH-related dislocation over the 2-year period, while the remaining facilities reported 1,295 cases.
The characteristics of children diagnosed with DDH-related dislocation were as follows: girls (89%), left side involvement (69%), bilateral involvement (4%), positive family history (27%), first-born (53%), and pelvic position at birth (15%). Seasonal variation showed an increase in DDH incidence among those born in the winter. Overall, 199 cases (15%) were diagnosed at >1 year of age, and these included 36 cases diagnosed very late, at >3 years of age. The majority of the 199 cases of late diagnosis had received earlier routine screening at <1 year of age. The characteristics of the children diagnosed with DDH nationwide were similar to past data from local regions. However, many children were diagnosed late (>1 year of age), particularly in the more populous regions. The findings identify a need for improved early routine screening for DDH in Japan.
Biography
Dr. Tadashi Hattori 1980 Graduated from Shinsyu University School of Medicine , Nagano, Japan
Professional career
1987-1998 Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
1998-2003 Aichi Prefectural Colony, Central Hospital, Kasugai, Japan
2003-2020 Aichi Children’s Health and Medical Center (ACHMC), Obu, Japan
Society Memberships
Japanese Pediatric Orthopedic Society
Executive-Director (2013~2018), Congress president (2020)
Japanese Society of Orthopedic Ultrasonics
Executive-Director (1995~2016), President (2017~)

  • Obafemi Awolowo University. Nigeria
  • Title:A GIS-based site investigation for nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Nigeria
  • Time :02:00 - 02:15 PM

Abstract
The Nigeria Atomic Energy Commission (NAEC) has identified some sites for possible constructions of nuclear power plants in Nigeria. This paper addresses the conduct of a Geographic Information System (GIS) based suitability assessment of these sites for the proposed Nuclear Power Plant. Attempts to recommend sites for the nuclear power plants and other major constructions in Nigeria have been made in view of historical and recent occurrences both at regional and local level, with earthquake occurrences in Ghana (18th December, 1636 Ms = 5.7; 1862 ML~ 6.5 and Ms ≥ 6.5; 11th February, 1907 and 22nd of June, 1939 Ms~ 6.5 and mb~ 6.4), Guinea 22nd December, 1983 with (MW~ 6.3) coupled with recent activities of volcanic eruption of mount Cameroun (1986, 1999, 2000). The buried equatorial fault lines emanating from the seismically active zones of the Gulf of Guinea are in reactivation state. This study entails the use of GIS to integrate available administrative and comprehensive tectonic maps of Nigeria. Database for the recommended sites is in line with the guidelines and recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency. In this paper, recommended sites are those where seismic and other hazards are considered to be at the bearest minimum.

  • Federico II Naples University, Italy
  • Title:Human Exposures to Rare earth Elements: Present Knowledge and Research Prospects
  • Time :11:45 - 12:00 PM

Abstract
Compared to the growing body of literature on REE-associated toxicity in a number of biota, relatively scarce reports are available on the effects of human occupational REE exposures. Early studies reported on the adverse effects of REE aerosol or dust, as case reports of respiratory damage in movie operators or lens grinders. More recent studies of occupational REE exposures were carried out on miners and on workers manufacturing cerium and lanthanum oxide, with reports of increased hair REE levels vs. controls, dysregulation of protein expression, and increased urinary REE levels vs. controls. A study of occupational exposures to REEs and other metals in e-waste processing was focused on the prevalence of anemia. The levels of REEs and other metals were found higher in anemic vs. non-anemic workers, suggesting that the higher REE and metal levels in anemic workers could play a role in the development of anemia.
Beyond the previously published studies, the currently widespread use of REEs in an extensive range of technologies raises environmental concern for occupational REE exposures including, among others, in the petrochemical industry and car repair due to the use of La in oil refining and of Ce for catalytic additives in diesel fuel production. We have an on-going study of REE levels in mechanic workshops, aimed at evaluating the effects of REE-containing diesel exhaust particulate matter among exposed workers. The current results point to different REE content on the workshop floor related to different exhaust abatement devices, as well as increased REE levels in urine of mechanics vs. controls. Whether, or not, REE excretion is accompanied by hair accumulation is a matter of on-going investigation.
Other subjects of investigation following occupational REE exposures, such as production of REE-containing supermagnets for wind turbines and for hybrid engines, warrant ad hoc research efforts.

Biography
Dr. Giovanni Pagano (GP) has been active for 40 years in studies of the adverse effects of several xenobiotics and complex mixtures. After retiring from the Italian National Cancer Institute in Naples, GP has remained active in international research activities. To date GP is committed as a Research Contractor at the Department of Chemical Sciences, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy. The subject of this presentation – REEs – has been investigated within an international research team, since an early paper in 2010.

  • University of Dublin, Ireland
  • Title:Pyroprocessing and Reactivity of Saudi Arabian Red mud (RM) Waste for the Production of Sustainable Binders
  • Time :12:45 - 01:00 PM

Abstract
The high embodied energy and Carbon emissions of traditional binders have led to a search for alternative cements. This paper explores the composition and reactivity of a red mud (RM) generated in vast quantities in Saudi Arabia, with a view to replace non-sustainable binders in construction.
RM waste is produced when refining bauxite for the production of aluminium. Previous authors estimate that 70-120 million tons of RM are generated annually, and stored on land or in the ocean near alumina refineries. In Ma’aden, current production is around 6,000 tonnes per day (over 2 million tonnes per year) which leads to long term disposal problems and land decommissioning costs. To date, due to its high alkalinity, only small quantities RM (3 wt.%) have been incorporated into Portland cement. However, the quantities need to raise to at least 5-10% for a worthy disposal option, and a viable option has not yet been found.
This paper studies the physical properties, composition and reactivity of the Saudi RM, and concludes on its possible application as a binder. The silica content and alkalinity are considered, as well as the specific surface area and composition which determine reactivity. According to the results, the RM presents abundant surface available to reaction, superior to commercial Portland cement and to other pozzolanic and supplementary cements such as FA and GGBS. The results also evidenced that gibbsite- Al (OH)3 , hematite -Fe₂O3 and cancrinite – Na₆Ca₂[(CO₃)₂|Al₆Si₆O₂₄]• 2H₂O are the main components of the RM, and that some Boehmite- ϒ- AlO(OH) is also present, inherited form the parent bauxite. The high alkalinity and temperature of the Bayer process have transformed the original kaolinite into cancrinite. The phase transformation of the RM resulting from the pyroprocessing at several temperatures are determined with X-Ray Diffraction analyses. The paper explores the evolution of the crystalline phases and their reactivity based on the setting and strength development.

Biography
Dr. Sara Pavia is a Professor in the Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of Dublin Trinity College. Her work focusses on sustainable materials and construction including thermal insulation, alkali-activated cements and pozzolanic binders, earth construction, building limes, bio-aggregate concretes and waste activation. She also works on historic buildings in both industry and academia.
She has published seven books and 150 papers and she often works in industry, for Government bodies and in several European groups such as RILEM and CEN.

  • Rosen College University of Central Florida ,USA
  • Title:Extending Tourism Competitiveness to Human Development
  • Time :12:30 - 12:45 PM

Abstract
The study examines a recursive dynamic between tourism competiveness and human development. While, a connection between two concepts is arguable, tourism competitiveness provides the resources necessary to support and sustain expansion of human developments. Higher income countries exhibit healthier, productive and longer leaving populace relative to lower income countries. Thus, indicating that high income matters in shaping and supporting human development. Tourism competitiveness provides a chance to increase income opportunities and improve human development growth that includes one’s health, education and skill which in turn contribute to the increase in tourism competitiveness. However, little is known about nature, influences and dynamics between tourism competitiveness and human development. The study asses several research questions: 1. What creates the theoretical connection between tourism competitiveness and human development? 2. Does this connection explains differences in tourism competitiveness over time.

Biography
Dr. Valeriya Shapoval is an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida with areas of expertise in tourism, organizational psychology and big data analytics. She had published in the top hospitality and tourism journal such as Annals of Tourism Research, Journal of Travel Research and many others. Currently she is a managing editor of International Journal of Hospitality Management that is a 4th leading journal in the hospitality and tourism with SSCI impact factor of 4.46. She is a part of the Dick Pope Jr. Institute at Rosen college and was part of several international projects in the Caribbean Island that were focused on using tourism development to improved Islands’ local population living standards and increase of opportunities for improvement in employment and business.

  • University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Title:Renewable Energy from Lake Kivu, a Very Large Natural Digester
  • Time :12:15 - 12:30 PM

Abstract
Lake Kivu is located on the top of the African rift zone, between Rwanda and DR Congo. From banks of frozen lava in the catchment area of the lake, inflows of saline water to the lower levels of this 485 m deep lake generate a special system of ‘lids’ that hold down dissolved matter and thus also gases produced in its depths by anaerobic digestion of dead algae and other organic matter. In this way, the lake is unique; in its 500 km³ of water, it holds around 60 km³ of dissolved methane. It is probably the world’s largest natural digester of biomass generated in the upper, oxygenated layers of the lake. Not only gases but also nutrients are accumulated in the depths of the lake and when harvesting the gases, in a cyclic process some of these nutrients are brought to the surface, generating more biomass that sinks and generates more gas, thus enhancing the natural gas production.
At present, the main ‘lid’ in the lake holds the gases down at levels from where it may be accumulated and harvested without causing an eruption, but this ‘lid’ is lifting, and gases continue to accumulate. This situation constitutes a challenge; society must for all foreseeable future actively prevent eruptions of this lake like it happened in Lake Albano, Italy (396 BC) and in lakes Monoun and Nyos, Cameroon (1984 and 1986). An eruption of this lake could cause from hundreds of thousands to a few millions of casualties.
Done in the right way however, gas accumulation also constitutes an opportunity for continued extraction of renewable methane as the best tool to avoid future eruptions. This gas may be used e.g. for power production or for cooking in a deforested, populated area. Achieving this is not straight-forward. It is unusually multidisciplinary and complex to understand the lake’s special transport mechanisms and, on this basis, to define what the need for safe management and sustainability requires from developers and administrators. This understanding has only recently matured to such level that it may be used to define precise and unusual design requirements to developers. Only in this way can we in the centuries to come implement continued risk control while maximizing the use of this renewable resource. The presentation will explain these extraordinary conditions as well as the solutions.
Biography
Dr. Finn Hirslund has a MSc in chemical process engineering having specialized in dynamic processes and in energy efficiency. He has spent most of his professional life within the natural gas industry, designing natural gas treatment facilities while minimizing their risk and environmental impacts. Since 2005 Hirslund has been involved in assessing gas extraction methods from Lake Kivu as well as their impacts on the lake. As such he became a key member of the group of engineers and scientists that in 2007 to 2009 drafted (preliminary) rules for safe gas extraction from the lake. At that time, the scientific basis for this work was insufficient and partly erroneous. Hirslund therefore undertook studies in limnology and palaeolimnology, reaching a level sufficing to propose significant modifications to existing theory regarding the special transport mechanisms in this lake and published four papers (totalling 92 pages) on this subject. He has participated in four workshops on gas extraction from Lake Kivu and organized one of them. On this basis, since 2011, he has advised the Government of Rwanda on different aspects of safe and sustainable gas extraction and is at present likely the World’s leading expert in safe and sustainable gas extraction from Lake Kivu.

  • Systems Engineering Department, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
  • Title:Event-Triggered Feedback Control for Distributed Systems
  • Time :12:00 - 12:15 PM

Abstract
An integral ingredient to the operation of industrial or engineering systems, including cooperative robotics, sensor networks, and grid computing, is that its control architecture consisting of hardware and software protocols for exchanging system status and control signals. Current trends to control and monitor the operation of industrial or engineering systems are moving toward the use of an automated agent technology or distributed networked systems (DNS). A distributed networked system is a combination of several units working in collaboration pursuing assigned tasks to achieve the overall goal of the system.
In this presentation, we focus control strategies pertaining to DNS. Specifically, we address the issue of event-triggered feedback strategy in which the unit (local) control is equipped with additional information from neighbors (unit-to-unit communication) to achieve the global motion-coordination task. Our main goal is illuminate the merits/demerits of the foregoing strategy as well as the potential applications.

Biography
Dr. Magdi S. Mahmoud has been a Professor of Engineering since 1984. He is now a Distinguished Professor at KFUPM, Saudi Arabia. He served at different universities worldwide including Egypt (CU, AUC), Kuwait (KU), UAE (UAEU), UK (UMIST), USA (Pitt, Case Western), Singapore (Nanyang) and Australia (Adelaide). He lectured in Venezuela (Caracas), Germany (Hanover), UK ((Kent), USA (UoSA), Canada (Montreal) and China (BIT, Yanshan). He is the principal author of fifty-one (51) books, inclusive book-chapters and the author/co-author of more than 610 peer-reviewed papers. He is a fellow of the IEE, a senior member of the IEEE, the CEI (UK), and a registered consultant engineer of information engineering and systems (Egypt).

  • James Cook University , Singapore
  • Title: A Circular Economy Approach to Green Energy: Wind Turbine, Waste, and Material Recovery
  • Time :11:30- 11:45 AM

Abstract
Wind energy has been considered as one of the greenest renewable energy
sources over the last two decades. However, attention is turning to reducing the possible environmental impacts from this sector. We argue that wind energy would not be effectively ‘‘green” if anthropogenic materials are not given attention in a responsible manner. Using the concept of the circular economy, this paper considers how anthropogenic materials in the form of carbon fibers can reenter the circular economy system at the highest possible quality.b This paper first investigates the viability of a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer extraction process using thermal pyrolysis to recalibrate the maximum carbon fiber value by examining the effect of (a) heating rate, (b) temperature, and (c) inert gas flow rate on char yield. With cleaner and higher quality recovered carbon fibers, this paper discusses the economic preconditions for the takeoff and growth of the industry and recommends the reuse of extracted carbon fibers to close the circular economy loop.

Biography
Professor Adrian T. H. Kuah has investigated circular economy practices in Asia, measured perceptions toward remanufactured goods in the UK, examined photovoltaic tax incentives in China, and provided insights on material circular economy using composite recovery. In 2019, he was appointed by the Government to partake and represent Singapore’s interest in the standardization of ISO/TC 323 Circular Economy at the ISO. For his thought leadership, he was interviewed by leading newspapers such as the Financial Times, Straits Times, Cairns Post and Xinhua News, as well as by media such as the Australian WIN TV News. He has received a couple of citations, including Financial Times Professor of the Week (2013) and Oxford Scholarship (2014). He is a research leader at both The Cairns Institute, Australia and Centre for International Trade and Business in Asia, Singapore. He is also Professor at Ecole de Commerce de Tahiti in the French Polynesia. He received his Ph.D from the University of Manchester, ITP from SDA Bocconi, MBA from University of Strathclyde, and B.Eng from the Nanyang Technological University.

  • CEA French Atomic Commission - Energy Division - Marcoule Center- Dismantling and Waste Conditioning Department, France
  • Title:Management of Highly Radioactive Nuclear Waste coming from Nuclear Power Plants : Materials, Processes and Long-term Performance Assessment
  • Time :11:15- 11:30 AM

Abstract
This presentation is devoted to highly radioactive nuclear waste management, all around the world. A synthesis of the high level waste (HLW) typology and key characteristics is given, showing that nuclear glass and spent nuclear fuel need to be considered for long term disposal, depending on national strategies. A rationale for selecting a relevant conditioning process is then presented, describing the parameters and constraints to take into account. A brief description of the vitrification processes, the sole industrially deployed conditioning process for HLW, is then presented. The vitrified waste interim storage strategy is described. The knowledge about the long term performance of HLW, spent nuclear fuel and nuclear glass, in geological disposal is then detailed. Finally, the development of alternative conditioning processes for HLW are briefly presented.

Biography
Dr. Florence Bart is 56 years old and have a PhD “Material Sciences” – Glass Science and
15 years in R&D for Nuclear Waste Conditioning, especially in vitrification, cementation of effluents and solids and
15 years in Projects and Teams Management and 40 papers, several international collaborations, participation to many IAEA technical meetings, international conferences.

  • Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates
  • Title:Unconventional Resources, Hydraulic Fracturing, Water Management and Insights for Middle Eastern Reservoirs
  • Time :10:45 - 11:00 AM

Abstract
Water has been regarded as one of most important resources in the industrial sector and plays a pivotal role in the hydrocarbon industry. With modern advancements in technology, enhanced agricultural production and urbanization, numerous regions across the globe are currently facing water stress. Coupled with rapid population growth and energy demands, it is imperative to understand the influence of water resources within the hydrocarbon industry and examine current water management strategies. It is a need of the hour to enhance current strategies to source water more efficiently, especially within water scarce regions such as the Middle East.
Unconventional resources have significantly contributed to the modern energy market. However, extraction of hydrocarbon from unconventional reservoirs is heavily water-intensive as compared to conventional reservoirs. This comprehensive investigation analyzes key design parameters that affect productivity within typical Middle Eastern shale gas reservoirs. In addition, simple constrained cases were constructed to better understand the influence of these parameters with respect to the overall production and water requirement. Furthermore, potential regional challenges along with resource management strategies are also highlighted.
Biography
Dr. Rahman is an associate professor and has been teaching and conducting research since 2002 and has PhD in Petroleum Engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia. He published over 70 articles in the area of well stimulation, specifically in hydraulic fracturing, acid fracturing, and enhanced/improved oil and gas recovery and produced two patents. He was/is investigator of several external and internal funded research projects (funded by Abu Dhabi National Oil Company and Khalifa University). He served as technical committee member for several SPE conferences and workshops.

  • Geophysical Institute of Peru, Peru
  • Title:On the Dynamic Mechanisms of Intense Rainfall Events in the Central Andes of Peru, Mantaro Valley
  • Time :10:30 -10:45 AM

Abstract
The present study was aimed at analyzing the main atmospheric dynamic mechanisms associated with the occurrence of intense rainfall events above the Huancayo observatory (12.05°S, 75.32°W, 3313 m asl) in the central Andes of Perú (Mantaro valley) from January 2018 to April 2019. To identify the rainfall events, we used a set of instruments from the laboratory of physics, microphysics and radiation (LAMAR) composed by in-situ pluviometric observations, satellite remote sensing data (GPM), Cloud Radar (MIRA- 35c), Boundary Layer Tropospheric Radar (BLTR) and downscaling model simulations with WRF (resolutions: 18 km, 6 km and 2 km) and ARPS (0.5 km) models to analyze the dynamics of the atmosphere for the synoptic, meso and local processes that control the occurrence of these rainfall events. The results showed that all intense rainfall events are associated with the presence of thermal meso-scale circulations that transport moisture fluxes through passes with gentle slopes along both sides of the Andes. The easterly moisture fluxes come in from the South America Low Level Jet (SALLJ) and the westerly moisture fluxes from the Pacific Ocean. The arrival of these moisture flows to regions within the Mantaro valley depends on their coupling with the circulations at medium and high levels of the atmosphere. At the synoptic scale, the results show that the rainfall events can be separated into two groups: the first one associated with westerly circulations (WC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the weakening and eastern displacement of the anticyclonic Bolivian high-North east low (BH-NE) system, and the second associated with easterly circulations (EC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the intensification of the BH-NE system. The observed and simulated results showed that multicell convective systems of WC events are more extensive and deeper than EC events. This situation can be explained as the convergence of moisture fluxes from opposite directions occurred within the Mantaro basin for WC events. In contrast, for EC events, the convergence develops at the east Andes mountain range, following which the multicell storm system propagates westward, driven by easterly circulations. The EC events occur mostly in the summer months, while the WC events occur mostly in the autumn and spring months. Moreover, apparently the inertia gravity waves (IGWs) formed in the Amazon basin transport moisture and energy to the central Andes plateau and intensify the convection processes.

Biography
Dr. Jose Flores Rojas Graduated in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Meteorology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). He is Doctor in atmospheric sciences by the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Sao Paulo (IAG-USP). He has experience in the areas of Physics and Geosciences, with emphasis on Quantum Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, acting mainly on the following topics: Quantum Optics, Solar and Terrestrial Radiation, Meso Meteorology and Microscale and Earth Physics.

  • Lappeenranta, Finland
  • Title:Use of Real Options to Enhance Eater-energy Nexus in Mine Tailings Management
  • Time :10:15 - 10:30 AM

Abstract
Mine tailings are waste obtained after processing mineral ore to acquire element(s) of interest. They are a mixture of ground rocks with process effluents. The largest water sink at most mines is the tailing storage facility and inappropriate management of water content in mine tailings can become a threat to its stability, and consequently, its environmental safety. Also, for reasons pertaining to water scarcity, water reuse and recycling is a plausible option to mining companies. Proper handling of mine tailings and water supply management can considerably improve the water-energy nexus. In this article, we evaluate the water-energy nexus in copper mining companies using a water reduction model focused on mine tailing facilities and water supply to the mine site to find the trade-offs between water and energy. To find out about the economic outcomes of the options covered by the analysis, project valuation techniques with a real options approach are used. This approach deploys Monte Carlo simulation to perform sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to evaluate every cost component of each water management strategy. Results show that where seawater is supplied to the mine site, improving the reuse of water by using dewatering technologies will improve the water-energy nexus. Even though the costs of these technologies are elevated in comparison to traditional disposal method because they are energy-intensive, the reduction of water requirements in the mine will reduce the cost of its treatment and transport which accounts for a large proportion of the total cost.
Biography
Dr. Natalia Araya has a PhD in Mineral Processing Engineering from Universidad de Antofagasta, Chile and she is a doctoral student in Industrial Engineering and Management program at LUT University in Lappeenranta, Finland under a double degree agreement between both Universities. Her topic is on mine tailings water management for a sustainable mining industry. Her research interests are mine tailings management and valorization, water management in mining, sustainable development in mining, circular economy in mining.

  • Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania.
  • Title:Modeling of Catalytic Pyrolysis of Metallized Food Packaging Plastics Over Zeolite Catalyst
  • Time :10:00 - 10:15 AM

Abstract
Metallized food packaging plastics waste (MFPW) is the most complex waste of food packaging. Recently, the pyrolysis treatment has been used to decompose the plastic part of MFPW into paraffin wax product, while the metal fraction (aluminum) remained mixed with black carbon. In order to upgrade the wax products usually, catalytic pyrolysis is used. Within this frame, this research aims to study the catalytic pyrolysis behaviour of MFPW over ZSM-5 Zeolite catalyst with MFPW to catalyst ratios=10, 30, and 50 wt.%. Also, the composition of the obtained chemical compounds was determined using TG-FTIR and GC–MS system. After that, the catalytic pyrolysis kinetic of ZSM-5/MFPW were modelled using linear isoconversional method, distributed activation energy model (DAEM), and an independent parallel reaction kinetic model (IPR). The FTIR and GC-MS results showed that Benzene, Toluene, Hexane, methane, etc. was the main functional group and compounds and their intensity increase as concentration of ZSM-5 increasing. While the kinetics results showed that the activation energies were in the ranges of 174-289 kJ/mol. At the same time DAEM and IPR models succeeded to plot TGA-DTG curves with lower deviations.
Samy Yousef, senior researcher at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Kaunas University of Technology.

Biography
Dr. Samy Yousef has completed his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering, Cairo University, Egypt. After that, he obtained postdoctoral studies from Messina University, Italy, and University of Technology, Lithuania (two years). Since 2018, He is Associate Professor, senior researcher at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Kaunas University of Technology. He has published more than 58 papers (Scopus) in reputed journals with total impact factor >200 and H index (18). During the last four years, He has achieved several promising results in materials recovery from different wastes such as WEEE, food packaging plastics, solar cells, textile, glass fibre reinforced polymer composites, and banknote waste, etc. then reprocessing of extracting metals into high added value products and adapting laboratory technology for industrial scale and Circular Economy principles. Also, he participated in developing many sustainable energy conversion strategies for textile waste, clothes dryer, plastic waste, end-of-life cotton banknotes into energy products using pyrolysis technology.

  • University of Missouri-Kansas City, United States
  • Title:Heat Transfer Enhancement and Optimization Analysis of Energy Storage Based Solar Thermal Collector
  • Time :09:45 - 10:00 AM

Abstract
The application of solar water heating systems (SWHs) has attracted many attentions in recent years. The main component of a SWH system is the solar collector, and among various types of solar collectors, heat pipe evacuated tube solar collectors (HPETCs) are widely used. However, due to the intermittency in solar intensity, the HPETCs may not work at their maximum functionality. In this study, performance optimization of an HPETC integrated with phase change materials (PCMs), is investigated under normal and on-demand (stagnation) operations via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. In phase-I, the effect of heat pipe position on the overall performance of the collector is investigated. The results from phase-I show that the phase change process of PCM was expedited by 48 minutes under on-demand operation, for the collector with heat pipe in center, compared with conventional system (heat pipe at top), where in normal operation, the thermal energy storage enhancement is achieved, for the collector with heat pipe in center, by 24% increase in PCM’s melting fraction . In phase-II, the effect of various types of PCMs are investigated, where tritriacontane paraffin, xylitol, and erythritol are selected. In normal mode, the maximum exhibited total energy storage of 295.39 kJ/kg was acheived for paraffin tube, however, the fin temperature of xylitol tube was around 10 °C higher compared with the other tubes throughout the day. In on-demand operation, the maximum energy storage of 413.15 kJ/kg was achived for erythritol tube, however, the paraffin tube shows fin temperature difference of 14 °C compared with other tubes. Consequently, utilization of dual PCM of paraffin/xylitol in normal and paraffin/erythritol in on-demand operations is recommended to enhance system’s thermal performance. The results from this study can be a benchmark for further optimization of HPETCs in thermal energy storage systems.

Biography
Dr. Sarvenaz Sobhansarbandi is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and director of Advanced Renewable/Thermal Energy (ART-E) laboratory at University of Missouri-Kansas city in United Staes. Her research interests include renewable energy, solar energy and computational fluid dynamics focusing on energy analysis of solar thermal collectors. She is also interested in Hydrogen energy and fuel cell technology with application in stationary and portable power generation systems. She has gained several years of research experience in the broad area of Thermo-Fluids, particularly solar energy technology and thermal energy storage materials. She had exposure to design/modeling of technical issues both by simulation and in real field-testing. She is the recipient of Funding for Excellence (FFE) award, ASME 2017 best paper award and ASHRAE 2015-2016 award from North Texas section.

  • Wageningen University, Netherland
  • Title:Sustainability for Drinking Water Reservoirs: Central Softening and Floating Solar panels
  • Time :09:30 - 09:45 AM

Abstract
Drinking water utilities in the Netherlands aim to reduce the CO2 footprint in order to become CO2 neutral in the coming years. A preferred route to achieve this is by reducing the CO2 footprint in the primary drinking water production processes. This can be done by using more sustainable chemicals, recycling residual/waste streams and by modifying the production process, for example by applying central softening.
We recently published a paper in which we demonstrate that central softening in drinking water production leads to a net reduction of the carbon footprint. The full life cycle assessment shows that the detrimental contributions to the carbon footprint, due to the use of chemicals and energy for central softening, are outweighed by the beneficial contributions at the household level, where reduced scaling leads to prolonged lifespan of appliances, reduced energy consumption and reduced use of cleaning agents. We estimate that the net total carbon footprint of drinking water softening in the Netherlands is around -0.11 Mtons CO2 equivalent per year.
Nevertheless, CO2 neutrality cannot be achieved by only focusing on reduced emissions in the primary production processes. Part of the CO2 footprint reduction needs to come from compensation, one way to achieve this is by employing floating solar panels. However, little is known on the effects of floating solar at large scale on water quality and ecology. We therefore designed a floating solar pilot and installed this on one of the water reservoirs (depth <4m) at Evides Water Company, a company based in the south of the Netherlands. Evides relies mostly on surface water for the production of drinking water, and river water is stored in large reservoirs. Several quality parameters have been monitored over multiple years, which include: 1) physico-chemical (oxygen, temperature, organic carbon, heavy metals, etc.), 2) microbiological (fecal bacteria) and 3) (hydro)biological (birds, water plants, plankton. Biography
Dr. Albert van der Wal currently leads the R&D team for drinking water production at Evides Water Company and is professor at Wageningen University (NL), specialized in sustainable (drinking) water production with focus on membrane filtration, capacitive deionization (CapDI) for water softening and desalination, removal of organic micropolltants and sand and biological activated carbon filtration. He obtained a PhD in Physical Chemistry and Microbiology.

  • Federal Technological University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:Modeling of the Dispersion of Pollutants in Porous Media: Case of a Landfill in Brazil
  • Time :09:15 - 09:30 AM

Abstract
Municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal systems are still a sanitary and environmental problem. The high concentration of toxic substances existing in liquids arising from the decomposition of waste, present a risk to human health and the environment. It is necessary to establish mechanisms to predict leachate dispersion in order to determine possible scenarios and control systems. This work investigates the dispersion of leachate from urban solid waste through saturated soil. The municipal landfill of Jacarezinho in Brazil is the focus of the study. The conceptual model was based on existing data from geology, hydrology, hydrogeology and leachate characterization. The codes MODFLOW and MT3DMS were used and the dispersion of chromium, copper, lead and zinc was simulated. Pollutant mass concentration fields were calculated in 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 years. The results indicated that the pollutants could reach the Ouro Grande River, in a period of 5 years and the tributary in a period of 1 year of the initial generation of leachate. For the final period of the simulation, the tributary of the Ouro Grande River received copper and lead concentrations that exceeded the maximum values allowed in Brazilian legislation for the watercourse quality standard. It was concluded that the Jacarezinho landfill has the potential to pollute the surrounding soil and groundwater.

Biography
Dr. Jonathan Steven M. F was Born in Colombia. He is an Environmental Engineer graduated from the Meta University Corporation in Colombia (2014), Specialist in Safety and Health at Work from the University of Los Llanos in Colombia (2016), obtained Master´s degree from Environmental Science and Technology from the Federal Technological University of Paraná in Brazil (2020). He has 7 years of experience as an environmental engineer in solid waste management companies and 5 years of experience as an undergraduate university professor. Since 2016 he has been a professor at the Faculty of Environmental Engineering of the Santo Tomas University in Colombia, where he has directed several final papers, most of them related to solid waste. Currently, he is a researcher at the Universidad Santo Tomás and works in the area of Green Chemistry and environmental simulation.

  • Ayodeji Olalekan Salau, Nigeria
  • Title:Modeling and Performance Analysis of Dye-sensitized Solar Cell Based on ZnO Compact Layer and TiO2 Photoanode
  • Time :

Abstract
Renewable energy, especially solar energy is a vital alternative solution to power challenge in these present times. More recently, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) play an important role in solar power generation. The performance of DSSC can be increased by adding more cells to a cell stack in a Tandem cell with a separate band gap. A double-layer structured DSSC was analyzed in this study in which ZnO and TiO2 composite photo-anodes were prepared on Fluorine-doped tin oxide. Photovoltaic properties such as current–voltage (I-V) and photocurrent density–voltage curves were investigated for different thickness, absorption coefficients, and wavelengths. DSSC solar cell characterization technique such as I-V measurement was analyzed to evaluate the cells performance. The experimental results show an approximate increase in current of 0.02 A causing the I-V characteristics to change significantly when ZnO and TiO2 are combined. In addition, it was observed that as the J-V characteristics of TiO2 varies with electrode thickness, the current density Jsc increases simultaneously and reaches its peak point at 10 μm.

Biography
Dr. Ayodeji Olalekan Salau have received his B.Eng. in Electrical/Computer Engineering from the Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. He received his MSc and PhD degree in Electronic and Electrical Engineering from the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. His research interests include research in the fields of computer vision, image processing, signal processing, machine learning, power systems engineering, and nuclear engineering. Dr. Salau serves as a reviewer for numerous reputable international journals. His research has been published in a number of reputable international conferences, books, and major international journals. He is a registered Engineer with the Council for the Regulation of Engineering in Nigeria (COREN), a member of the International Association of Engineers (IAENG), and a recipient of the Quarterly Franklin Membership with ID number CR32878 given by the Editorial Board of London Journals Press in 2020 for top quality research output. In addition, Dr. Salau’s paper was awarded the best paper of the year 2019 in Cogent Engineering. Furthermore, he is the recipient of the International Research Award on New Science Inventions (NESIN) under the category of “Best Researcher Award” given by ScienceFather in 2020. He is the recipient of the International Best Researcher Award given by the ISSN International Science & Technology Awarding body (IISTAC-2022) in 2022. Also, he was also awarded the best researcher award for the year 2020-2022 by the Chancellor of Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti (ABUAD), Nigeria. Presently, Dr. Salau works at Afe Babalola University in the Department of Electrical/Electronics and Computer Engineering.

  • University of Cape Coast, Ghana
  • Title:Prioritizing Zero-waste Performance and Green Differentiation Advantage Through the Prism of Circular Principles Adoption: A Mediated Approach
  • Time :

Abstract
Circular economy has become one of the mainstream concepts to deal with environmental issues. However, research on the circularity theme (especially at the firm-level) is still evolving. Taking inspiration from the natural resource-based view and practice-based view theoretical lenses, this study proposes a research framework that explores the direct and indirect relationships between circular principles adoption, cleaner production, total quality environmental management, zero-waste performance and green differentiation advantage. The explanatory research design, with a questionnaire-based survey methodology, was employed to address the focal objective of the study. Data for the study was drawn from Ghanaian manufacturing SMEs. The study utilizes partial least-square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to test the hypothesized relationships and validate the proposed research model. The results suggest that circular principles adoption alone may have an insignificant impact on zero-waste performance and green differentiation advantage. However, circular principles adoption can lead to the effective implementation of cleaner production and total quality environmental management. The results also reveal that both cleaner production and total quality environmental management bring about a significant influence on zero-waste performance and green differentiation advantage. The originality of this work stems from developing a novel research framework that establishes cleaner production and total quality environmental management as important indirect mechanisms through which circular principles adoption can significantly influence zero-waste performance and green differentiation advantage. The theoretical, managerial and policy implications of the study are also discussed.

Biography
Dr.Gloria Kakrabah-Quarshie Agyapong is a Senior Lecturer and Head of the Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. She holds a PhD in Business Administration and a Professional Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing from the Chartered Institute of Marketing, UK. Her research interests include service quality management, total quality management, public sector marketing communications, and social media advertising.

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