• National Academy of Sciences Belarus, Belarus
  • Title:Antioxidant Properties of Lipolytic Enzymes as a New Instrument For Estimation The Effects of UV Radiatioa
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Abstract

As is known, photochemical processes are accompanied by the formation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which give rise to a cascade of reactions ending under extreme conditions by unwanted disruption of the natural structure of the lipids (LPO) and protein, inactivation of enzymes and destruction of DNA, which together serves as a manifestation of oxidative stress. All compounds that reduce the concentration of unsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides (UFAH) resulting from ROS action in the lipid phase, are antioxidants.
We are the first (Patent BY No. 019669), who used the increased sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) to oxidized phospholipids compared to non-oxidized forms to estimate the degree of lipid peroxidation as a result of UV exposure ( = 180-400 nm). We have found that the system” PLA2 – hemoproteins – oxidized phospholipids“ allow to detect the total antioxidant activity of biological liquids. This is very important in terms of estimation adverse environmental effects on humans.

Biography

Dr. Natalia M. Litvinko, laureate the State Prize of the Republic of Belarus, PhD in Chemistry (N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of Academy of Sciences of the Soviet Union, Moscow), Doctor of Chemical sciences (Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus), an Associate professor of Chemistry, Vice Chief Scientific Secretar of National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Head of the Laboratory of Aplied enzymology of Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of NAS Belarus. Нer interests are interfacial catalysis of lipolytic reactions and its application. She published more than 250 research papers and 16 patents.

  • Cairo University, Egypt
  • Title:Micro Study of Biological Granule Size and Biogas Production in UASB Reactor
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Abstract

This study investigates a dynamic model of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor for the effect of biological granule size on high-strength wastewater treatment. The model can also investigate the biogas production rate in bed and blanket zones of UASB reactor. Different amounts of methane gas are explored by methanogenic bacteria that can be used as a source of green energy. The simulation results indicate high COD removal of about 80% – 90% in UASB reactor as granule size declines to 1 mm. Moreover, the biomass concentration boosts to 90 and 25 kg/m3 in reactor bed and blanket zones, respectively as granule size declines to 1 mm at substrate concentration of 3 kg/m3.

Biography

Mostafa M. El-Seddik got his BSc in Civil Engineering at Cairo University, Egypt in 2007. He was awarded the MSc in Environmental and Sanitary Engineering at Cairo University in 2011. He performed his PhD on anaerobic wastewater treatment at Cairo University in 2016. His current position is the Head of Civil Engineering Department at Institute of Aviation Engineering & Technology. He is also a member in the Institute Administration Council. His contribution was significant in IWA World Water Congress & Exhibition in Lisbon, Portugal in 2014. Consecutively, he worked as a reviewer for IWA World Water Congress & Exhibition in Brisbane (2016) and Tokyo (2018). He revised several papers for Asian Journal of Plant Science and Research in 2017. He has participated as a peer reviewer for Journal of Environmental Management (Elsevier) in May 2018, and Ingeniería e Investigación Journal in March 2019. He published several international papers in Water Science and Technology (2016), Biochemical Engineering Journal (2018), Separation Science & Technology (2019), and Journal of Environmental Engineering (2019).

  • Osaka University, Japan
  • Title:Computational Molecular Modeling of Pt-Coupled TiO2 Photocatalysis: Sensitization Action of TiO2 Clusters for Effective Water Photo-Splitting Under UV Light Irradiance
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Abstract

Computational molecular modeling, i.e., density functional theory-based molecular modelling (DFT B3LYP/6-31-G*) (DFT/MM) verifies equilibrium geometry and surface electron energy structures of van der Waals force (vdW) molecular aggregates. What should be noted for the energy structures is that DFT/MM-predicted UV/Vis spectra are in good agreement with measured spectra of the aggregates.1) With these viewpoints, effective photoelectrochemical water splitting using mesoporous TiO2 anode and platinum cathode2), and effective water photo-splitting to HOOH and H2 on Pt-loaded TiO2 photocatalysts3) are reinvestigated by DFT/MM. DFT/MM-based UV/Vis spectrum analysis verifies that the anatase Yamashita & Jono’s model of HOTi9O18H has no absorption in the UV region, giving visible absorption spectrum with max=536 nm (strength 0.005). Then, DFT/MM was extended to vdW aggregates of smaller-size TiO2 clusters, (TiO2)n (n=1, 2, 4). Interestingly, DFT/MM-derived UV/Vis spectrum of (TiO2)4 shows max at 377 nm (strength 0.003), and the vdW aggregates of (TiO2)4 with H2O and with platinum triangle pole cluster of Pt6 validates that the molecular-structured TiO2 clusters, (TiO2)1~4 work as effective UV-induced photocatalysts2), and work as a UV-sensitizer in photoelectrochemical water splitting on biased TiO2 anode3).
1) Japanese Journal of Applied Physics 57, 121602 (2018).
2) Molecules 2015, 20(6), 9732-9744.
3) ECS Transactions, 80 (10) 1091-1112 (2017).

Biography

Shozo Yanagida is an emeritus professor of Osaka University since 2004 and a research director of “Research Association for Technological Innovation of Organic Photovoltaics” (RATO) of University of Tokyo. A year ago, he started research laboratory, “M3 Laboratory Inc.” in ISRI, Osaka University. When he was staying at SERI (now ENREL) as a visiting professor of Dr. A. Nozik’s group in 1984, he understand that organic and inorganic molecules have a strong tendency to aggregate each other via van der Waals and Coulomb interaction, forming two, three and four molecule aggregates, i.e., molecular structured aggregates. Now, he is focusing DFT/MM on functional materials as molecular vdW aggregates.

  • James Cook University , Singapore
  • Title: A Circular Economy Approach to Green Energy: Wind Turbine, Waste, and Material Recovery
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Abstract

Wind energy has been considered as one of the greenest renewable energy
sources over the last two decades. However, attention is turning to reducing the possible environmental impacts from this sector. We argue that wind energy would not be effectively ‘‘green” if anthropogenic materials are not given attention in a responsible manner. Using the concept of the circular economy, this paper considers how anthropogenic materials in the form of carbon fibers can reenter the circular economy system at the highest possible quality.b This paper first investigates the viability of a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer extraction process using thermal pyrolysis to recalibrate the maximum carbon fiber value by examining the effect of (a) heating rate, (b) temperature, and (c) inert gas flow rate on char yield. With cleaner and higher quality recovered carbon fibers, this paper discusses the economic preconditions for the takeoff and growth of the industry and recommends the reuse of extracted carbon fibers to close the circular economy loop.

Biography

Professor Adrian T. H. Kuah has investigated circular economy practices in Asia, measured perceptions toward remanufactured goods in the UK, examined photovoltaic tax incentives in China, and provided insights on material circular economy using composite recovery. In 2019, he was appointed by the Government to partake and represent Singapore’s interest in the standardization of ISO/TC 323 Circular Economy at the ISO. For his thought leadership, he was interviewed by leading newspapers such as the Financial Times, Straits Times, Cairns Post and Xinhua News, as well as by media such as the Australian WIN TV News. He has received a couple of citations, including Financial Times Professor of the Week (2013) and Oxford Scholarship (2014). He is a research leader at both The Cairns Institute, Australia and Centre for International Trade and Business in Asia, Singapore. He is also Professor at Ecole de Commerce de Tahiti in the French Polynesia. He received his Ph.D from the University of Manchester, ITP from SDA Bocconi, MBA from University of Strathclyde, and B.Eng from the Nanyang Technological University.

  • Fermentec, Brazil
  • Title:Increasing Industrial Productivity and Reduction of Vinasse Volumes of Fermentations with Recycling of Yeast Cells and High Ethanol Concentrations
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Abstract

Industrial processes of ethanol production in Brazil are characterized by faster fermentations (6-10 hours), high concentration of yeast cells (8-15% v/v), recycling of yeast cells and an alcoholic content around 8.0% (v/v) which represents a production of 12.4 litres of vinasse per liter of ethanol produced. Increasing ethanol concentration in wine reduces vinasse volumes, saves steam in the distillation process and reduces water consumption per liter of ethanol produced. Moreover, the benefits of raising ethanol concentrations to industrial productivity may be as significant as the savings generated by reducing, transporting and applying vinasse in the field. Despite of these benefits, the increase of industrial productivity is not always evident due to other factors that affect the industry. In addition, ethanol content may affect the fermentation time and residual sugars in raw wine. The objective of this work was to evaluate the relationship between ethanol content and increase in industrial productivity, reduction of vinasse volumes, as well as, its impact on other indicators such as residual sugars in the wine and fermentation time in industrial scale. This evaluation was based on data analysis from Brazilian distilleries in the last five years. The results showed an increase in ethanol content of fermentations, which correspond to a significant reduction in vinasse volumes and higher industrial productivity. In one case study, it was observed a reduction of more than 300 million litres of vinasse by increasing ethanol concentration in wine. In another distillery for every 1% more of ethanol concentration, the mill produced 813,000 litres more ethanol per week, without significant residual sugars in wine (below 0.1% w/v). These results demonstrate the benefits obtained from increased ethanol concentrations in the wine at 12% (v/v).

Biography

I`m graduated in Agronomy by “Universidade Para o Desenvolvimento do Estado de Santa Catarina” (UDESC), Brazil, in 1990. Master of Science in Nuclear Energy by “Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura” (CENA), São Paulo, Brazil, 1995 and PhD in Biological Sciences–Applied Microbiology by “Universidade Estadual Julio de Mesquita Filho” (UNESP), São Paulo, Brazil, 2000. I began to work at Fermentec in 1997 as microbiologist and after three years started as assessor of the presidency. In 2007, I became Scientific Coordinator of Research and Analysis (Fermentec) and in 2010 started as Scientific Director (Fermentec) responsible for research projects carried out in collaboration with Universities and Research Institutes in Brazil and abroad. Since 2008, I have worked for selection of customized yeast strains from industrial processes of ethanol production in Brazil. Since 2013, I have worked for development of technologies to reduce the vinasse volumes and its environmental impact.

  • Systems Engineering Department, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
  • Title:Event-Triggered Feedback Control for Distributed Systems
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Abstract

An integral ingredient to the operation of industrial or engineering systems, including cooperative robotics, sensor networks, and grid computing, is that its control architecture consisting of hardware and software protocols for exchanging system status and control signals. Current trends to control and monitor the operation of industrial or engineering systems are moving toward the use of an automated agent technology or distributed networked systems (DNS). A distributed networked system is a combination of several units working in collaboration pursuing assigned tasks to achieve the overall goal of the system.
In this presentation, we focus control strategies pertaining to DNS. Specifically, we address the issue of event-triggered feedback strategy in which the unit (local) control is equipped with additional information from neighbors (unit-to-unit communication) to achieve the global motion-coordination task. Our main goal is illuminate the merits/demerits of the foregoing strategy as well as the potential applications.

biography

Magdi S. Mahmoud has been a Professor of Engineering since 1984. He is now a Distinguished Professor at KFUPM, Saudi Arabia. He served at different universities worldwide including Egypt (CU, AUC), Kuwait (KU), UAE (UAEU), UK (UMIST), USA (Pitt, Case Western), Singapore (Nanyang) and Australia (Adelaide). He lectured in Venezuela (Caracas), Germany (Hanover), UK ((Kent), USA (UoSA), Canada (Montreal) and China (BIT, Yanshan). He is the principal author of fifty-one (51) books, inclusive book-chapters and the author/co-author of more than 610 peer-reviewed papers. He is a fellow of the IEE, a senior member of the IEEE, the CEI (UK), and a registered consultant engineer of information engineering and systems (Egypt).

  • University of Pardubice,Czech Republic
  • Title:Green Approach to the Synthesis of Cd-Zn-S(Se) Quantum Dots
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Abstract

Semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) with stable and wavelength-tunable photoluminescence (PL) are very promising emitters for various photonic and optoelectronic applications. Up to date, there are many synthetic protocols providing nanomaterials. In this study we applied the preparation in the liquid dispersion phase, which is a colloidal synthesis in an organic medium with the participation of surfactants. Environmentally friendly and commercially available substituted thio- [1] and selenoureas [2] in combination with well-known methods are suitable sulphur and selenium precursors for the highly reproducible synthesis and further large-scale production of ternary Cd-Zn-S(Se) QDs. This study was carried out to examine the mechanism of interaction between substituted thio- and selenoureas with metal carboxylates [3] under the influence of oleylamine, which was taken as a base in the synthesis of QDs. Also, the influence of substituents (aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic fragments) in substituted thioureas on the synthesis kinetics and optical properties of the resulting nanomaterials has been described. The homogeneity of the QDs elemental composition and uniformity in size and shape were confirmed by appropriate studies on these materials. It is also shown that reproducible synthesis with 24 times scaling (till 10 g) makes this approach very promising for the transfer to the industry. The findings of the study show that uniform and highly photoluminescent (photoluminescence quantum yield up to 67 %) can be easily transferred to industrial production, due to the high reproducibility and safety of the presented methods.

Biography

Dr. Liudmila Loghina, senior scientific researcher in the Center of Materials and Nanotechnologies, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic. PhD in organic chemistry (2011) – Institute of Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of Moldova. The fields of actual experimental interests are research, design and analyses of organic and inorganic quantum dots, photopolymers, organic and inorganic scintillators for medical and optical applications. Synthesis of polymer compositions for application in process of optical images recording, investigation of photoinduced phenomena in chalcogenide glasses and polymer materials.

  • University of Rennes,France
  • Title:Improvement of Fermentation From Hydrolysate of Green Macroalgae for Bioethanol Production on a Lab- Scale and on a Pilot-Scale
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Abstract

The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of ethanol bioproduction from hydrolysate of macroalgea. Firstly, experiments were carried out with a synthetic medium adjusted on algal hydrolysate composition with four yeast strains: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Kluyveromyces marxianus. Nitrogen source, inoculum size and salt contents were examined.
Secondly, the study focused on the fermentation of hydrolysate from the green macroalgae Ulva rigida, confirming the possibility of converting algal hydrolysate into bioethanol, without nitrogen enrichment and sterilization. It was observed that pH regulation and aeration were not essential for the ethanol production. In these conditions, the experiment gave a concentration of 12 g L-1 and the conversion rate of glucose into bioethanol reached 82%. For the lab-scale assays, the media volume varied between 250 to 1 500 mL.
Finally, the scale up process was examined on a pilot scale (77 L) using S. cerevisiae growing on a hydrolysate of Chaetomorpha sp. This experiment gave a concentration of 5.6 g L-1 (lower than the results obtained during previous tests because of the limited hydrolysis yield), but with an efficiency of 97%.

Biography

Hayet DJELAL is Associate Professor at UniLasalle-Ecole des Métiers de l’Environnement, France. Her main research activities are related to Bioprocess Engineering, particularly chemical and bioprocesses development, development of elimination of micropollutants and biotreatment of industrial wastewater. She also works on aerobic and anaerobic fermentation technologies.
She supervised 7 PhD thesis concluded and 3 others are in progress, as well as more than 10 Master students. She has published 55 articles in scientific international journals with peer reviewing and she is associate editor of one scientific journal. She participated and coordinated several scientific projects with external financial support and she is implicated in national and international collaborations as Mexico, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon …

  • Russian State Agrarian University,Russia
  • Title:The Main Features of Global and Photosynthesis and its Evolution in the Global Carbon Turnover
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Abstract

From the point of a new model of global carbon turnover photosynthesis and its evolution should be considered only in connection with geological processes on the Earth. Global photosynthesis is the main element of the global carbon cycle and is the result of activity of all living on the planet photosynthesizing organisms. First it was shown that the global photosynthesis can be described by the same equation as traditional photosynthesis. Final approximation of this equation can be expressed as follows
hv
(CO2+H2O)atmosphere+hydrosphere → COM + O2 atmosphere

The role of biomass in it is played by buried organic matter which is transformed biomass of organisms lived in the past. Most of the global photosynthesis features also similar to those of traditional one. According to the equation, the reaction substrate, concentration of CO2 in the environment, is inversely proportional to the reaction product, atmospheric oxygen concentration, whereas the reaction products, atmospheric O2 concentration and analog of biomass, the rate of accumulation of buried organic matter are proportional. The analysis shows that global photosynthesis has all the features of traditional photosynthesis, except the ability to ontogeny. Like traditional, global photosynthesis has photoassimilation and photorespiration. The amount of synthesized biomass depends on the CO2/O2 ratio in the environment. CO2 concentration growth in the environment provides increasing assimilation and biomass growth, O2 concentration growth stimulates photorespiration and reduces the biomass growth. Global photosynthesis has the ability to fractionate carbon isotopes. Increased assimilation leads to the enrichment of biomass with the 12C isotope. Increased photorespiration enriches biomass with 13C isotope. Cyclicity is the main feature of photosynthesis evolution. It is the result of its participation in orogenic cycles that ultimately arise due to the gravitational influence of celestial bodies on the earth’s orbital motion around the sun. This affects magma convection causing lithospheric plates’ motion. Moving plates collide and evolving energy initiates thermochemical sulfate reduction which oxidizes sedimentary organic matter. Resultant CO2 fills “atmosphere hydrosphere” system and stimulates photosynthesis. Subsequent development of photosynthesis reduces CO2 concentration and evolves O2. These sequence of events results in climatic and biotic turnover. All the sequence of events composes the orogenic cycles and ends with mass extinction of organisms. The participation in orogenic cycles provided repeated combination of CO2 entry and subsequent developing photosynthesis which completed by abrupt dramatic change for another cycle. Multiple repetition of photosynthesis dynamics against the background of progressive and irreversible changes in the oxygenation of the environment led to the consolidation of the most important useful properties of living systems. On the other hand, it brought the whole system to a stationary state

Biography

Dr. Alexander Ivlev received his PhD (1968) in the Chemical Technology Institute of Mendeleyev (Moscow). The next PhD (1986), he got in the Institute of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences for research on biophysical mechanisms in photosynthesizing cell. In 2005 he was awarded the medal of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences “To Author of Scientific Discovery” for establishing link between distribution of carbon isotopes in metabolites and temporal organization of metabolic processes. Since 1971 he worked in the Scientific Research Institute of Oil Prospecting. In 1995 he became a Professor of Russian State Agrarian University. Here he discovered the carbon isotope effect in photorespiration (1993) and the oscillatory nature of photosynthesis (2004) and began the project “ Global Carbon Cycle”. He is an author of 5 scientific monographs and over 230 publications in Russian and foreign journals. His last monograph (2019) was published in Cambridge Scholars Publishing is entitled “The Global Carbon Cycle and the Evolution of Photosynthesis”.

  • Rosen College University of Central Florida ,USA
  • Title:Extending Tourism Competitiveness to Human Development
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Abstract

The study examines a recursive dynamic between tourism competiveness and human development. While, a connection between two concepts is arguable, tourism competitiveness provides the resources necessary to support and sustain expansion of human developments. Higher income countries exhibit healthier, productive and longer leaving populace relative to lower income countries. Thus, indicating that high income matters in shaping and supporting human development. Tourism competitiveness provides a chance to increase income opportunities and improve human development growth that includes one’s health, education and skill which in turn contribute to the increase in tourism competitiveness. However, little is known about nature, influences and dynamics between tourism competitiveness and human development. The study asses several research questions: 1. What creates the theoretical connection between tourism competitiveness and human development? 2. Does this connection explains differences in tourism competitiveness over time.

Biography

Dr. Shapoval is an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida with areas of expertise in tourism, organizational psychology and big data analytics. She had published in the top hospitality and tourism journal such as Annals of Tourism Research, Journal of Travel Research and many others. Currently she is a managing editor of International Journal of Hospitality Management that is a 4th leading journal in the hospitality and tourism with SSCI impact factor of 4.46. She is a part of the Dick Pope Jr. Institute at Rosen college and was part of several international projects in the Caribbean Island that were focused on using tourism development to improved Islands’ local population living standards and increase of opportunities for improvement in employment and business.

  • Wayne State University ,USA
  • Title:An Enolate-Mediated Regioselective Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazoles via Azide-Aldehydes or Ketones [3+2]- Cycloaddition Reactions in Aqueous Phase
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Abstract

Objectives: We present a ‘greener’ synthesis for the direct conversion of arylazides into the corresponding trizoles
via phase transfer catalyst-assisted [3+2] cycloaddition in aqueous phase.
Methods: The synthesis of triazoles were approached (Figure 1) based on previously published methods for azide- aldehyde [1] and azide-ketone [2]. In an ordinary glass tube equipped with a magnetic stirring bar, to aldehydes or ketones (0.21 mmol), TBAHS (0.042 mmol) and KOH (0.42 mmol) were added successively in Milli-Q water (1 mL) at RT. Finally, corresponding arylazide (0.21 mmol) was added to above RM. This RM was stirred at RT for 2 minutes which was subsequently heated for 24 h to 48 h at 100 °C. The reaction progress was monitored by TLC and after consumption of starting aldehyde/ketone, RM was cooled to RT. The crude RM was extracted with ethyl acetate and it was dried over Na2SO4, filtered and concentrated. Product 3 was obtained by column chromatography and characterized by using NMR and MS.
Results: Present synthetic approach covering a structurally diverse group of aryl azides 1(a-e) and aldehydes 2(a-b) or ketones 2(g–n) to obtain high yields of varieties of triazoles. In addition, the excellent yields are even more impressive considering that water was the only solvent. Overall, our methodology has proven robust and demonstrated by the preparation of twenty-seven different triazoles, fourteen of them reported for the first time.

Conclusions: We have developed a simple, versatile, and green route for enolate-mediated azide-aldehyde or ketone [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction which enables the synthesis of triazoles containing a variety of functional groups with excellent regioselectivity using water as the only solvent. This water-compatible and phase transfer catalyst- assisted catalytic synthetic approach which provides a stepping stone towards a greener organic synthesis in pharmaceutical industries.

Biography

I was born and raised in Pune, India. After finishing my Masters degree with specialization in Organic Chemistry at the University of Pune, India (2009) I joined the National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) also in Pune, where I stayed for 1 & 1/2 years. Then, I spent 2 years working in a private pharmaceutical company in Pune, India. At the beginning of 2013, I was offered the Ph.D. opportunity to become a member of Dr. Llop´s research group at CIC biomaGUNE, Spain. Later, I joined the group in October 2013 and finally I have completed my Ph.D. on June 1st 2017 by working on the development of new strategies for the synthesis of 13N‐labelled compounds. In 2017, I began my first post doctoral position in National Chemical Laboratory (NCL), Pune, India. Here, main objective of the project to achieve click chemistry of triazoles using Azide ‐Aldehydes or Ketones [3+2]‐cycloaddition reactions using water as a green solvent. Presently, I am working as a Research Associate at Wayne State University, Detroit, USA since October 2018. Currently, I am developing the novel radiotracers with F‐18 for HDACs. I have six scientific international publications till date. I presented or participated in five different international conferences and one of my poster presentation in ISRS 2015 was selected as an outstanding poster in University of Missouri, USA. I received European prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship and National Post Doctoral fellowship under my research study.

  • National University of the Center of Peru, Peru
  • Title:Bacterial Communities of Lake Sediments of Biotechnological Interest for the Recovery of Wastewater from the Dairy Industry Analyzed by Next Generation Sequencing IlluminI
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Abstract

Bacterial communities are important drivers of nutrient transformations in freshwater aquatic environments and play a crucial role in the biogeochemical cycle of sediments. In this study, the composition of the bacterial communities of lake sediments of biotechnological interest for the recovery of wastewater from the dairy industry by means of next generation sequencing Illumina. Surface sediment samples (10 cm) were collected from four inland water fish culture ponds in November 2019. DNA extraction was performed from 0.5 g of sample through the PrestoTM Soil DNA Extraction Kit. Bacterial sequencing of the 16S rRNA amplicon was performed on the DNA extracted from the sediment. At least 36 Phyla bacteria were detected, the bacterial communities being dominated by Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi. Finally, these data can be used for predictive analysis in order to have a better understanding of the dynamics of the bacterial communities in environments pressured by fish farming.

Biography

Dr. María Custodio is a Biologist, Master Scientiae in Biotechnology, Doctor in Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Human Medicine of the Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú, with experience in the research of continental aquatic ecosystems. His current research focuses on monitoring and evaluating the quality of the aquatic environment, environmental impacts and environmental and human risk assessment for exposure to heavy metals. As of 2017, he directs the Water Research Laboratory of the Universidad Nacional del Centro del Perú. She is the director of the Center for Research in Altitude and Environmental Medicine and a researcher for the National Council for Science, Technology and Technological Innovation.

  • National University of the Center of Peru, Peru
  • Title:Visitor Environmental Impact on Protected Natural Areas: An Evaluation of the Huaytapallana Regional Conservation Area in Peru
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Abstract

Protected natural areas, especially regional conservation areas, are important for preserving biodiversity, ecosystem services and recreation. The Huaytapallana Regional Conservation Area in the Junín region of Peru is a mountain ecosystem providing hydrological, cultural, and tourism ecosystem services to the population. This study evaluated the environmental impact of visitors on two tourist trails (one vehicular and one pedestrian) and two ritual zones in this area using a Leopold matrix. Sample plots were previously installed of 20 × 25 m (subdivided into five sub-plots) systematically distributed. Organic and inorganic waste was quantified. The overall environmental impact of visitors in the natural environment was negative (−-532) with soil, air, and wild fauna the most affected; on the other hand, socioeconomic factors were positive overall (504).

Biography

Edith Maldonado. Anthropologist, Master Scientiae in Ecotourism, Dra. in Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development, professor at the Faculty of Anthropology, Universidad Nacional del Centro del Peru. Research on sustainable tourism, impact of tourism and ecotourism and conservation of biodiversity in natural protected areas used for tourism.

  • Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo, Mexico
  • Title:Geochemical Behavior of Filter Materials used in Green Infrastructure and their Decontaminating Potential of Surface Runoff
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Abstract

The urban hydrological cycle needs to be reestablished due to the effects it suffers from the anthropogenic activities (surface waterproofing, increased surface runoff, diffuse pollution, among others). Green infrastructure such as infiltration trenches, rain gardens, or pervious concrete is an excellent alternative to complement the hydraulic and environmental efficiency of urban infrastructure. Different studies analyze options to improve the quality of the water that is infiltrated through this type of infrastructure. The physical and chemical characteristics of the material selected for adaptation are essential to mitigate the infiltrated water’s polluting effect on the subsoil. This work presents a geochemical approach to the behavior of filter materials used in infiltration trenches and/or rain gardens. Samples of soil, sand, gravel, and volcanic slag used in this type of green infrastructure were analyzed to determine its decontaminating potential. Synthetic runoff water quality analyses were performed and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy on the filter materials (in the dry and saturated state, after infiltrating runoff water). To determine the materials’ geochemical behavior in contact with water, the software PHREEQCE was used. The water quality results were compared with national/international standards, while the change in its quality (before and after coming into contact with the filter materials) was observed through the geochemical interactions that occurred. The results showed the materials’ ability to remove pollutants through the formation of secondary minerals (rhodochrosite) and others’ precipitation (anglesite). However, it was also found that some minerals contained in the filter material, can solubilize ions that could be toxic to the environment. Therefore, this work highlights the importance of geochemically characterizing the materials before building green infrastructure.

Biography

Dr. Lizárraga-Mendiola is a full-time research professor at the Autonomous University of the State of Hidalgo, Mexico, since 2008. She is a Civil Engineer with a master’s degree in Geological Sciences (specialty in groundwater) and a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences (specialty in environmental geology). She has prizes for the best postgraduate thesis (2005) and research in Engineering and Technology (2006) from the Autonomous University of the State of Nuevo León, Mexico. She has published international scientific articles, directed doctoral and undergraduate theses, and is a national researcher, recognized by the National Council of Science and Technology.

  • Federal Technological University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:Quality Reference Values for Heavy Metals In Soils Developed from Basic Rocks under Tropical Conditions.
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Abstract

Soil Quality Reference Values (QRV) refer to the natural heavy metal concentrations that is not influenced or is minimally influenced by anthropogenic activities. Such values are unique of each environment, and their extrapolation to different locations becomes inadequate. This research aimed to determine the natural concentrations of metals in soils (QRV) developed on essentially basaltic lithology and tropical conditions in the south of Brazil. Seventy-two soil samples from the Forest Conservation Areas in the west of the state of Paraná, Brazil, were obtained. The extraction and dosage of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were carried out employing methods USEPA 3051a and ICP-OES. The QRV was set to 75th percentile of each element, from the detection and exclusion of the outliers. The natural concentration of all heavy metals was related to the geological context of the basaltic area in Brazil. There was no influence of the pedogenetic degree of soils on the natural heavy metal concentration. The only relevant process for reducing the natural heavy metal levels was the Fe and Mn oxide solubility promoted by hydromorphic conditions. Fe oxides had a significant role in the maintenance of structural and adsorbed heavy metal forms in soils. The results may help the research and monitoring of environmental heavy metals in soils developed from basalt under tropical conditions.

Biography

Dr Juliane Maria Bergamin Bocardi has doctorate in Applied Chemistry, with an emphasis on Environmental Chemistry, from the State University of the Midwest, Paraná, Brazil (UNICENTRO). She has master’s degree in Applied Chemistry with an emphasis on Natural Products from the State University of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil (UEPG) and a degree in Chemistry from the State University of Western Paraná (UNIOESTE). She is currently Chemistry professor in the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Brazil, campus Medianeira (UTFPR). Develops activities in the areas of Environmental Chemistry such as environmental monitoring and control.

  • Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates
  • Title:Unconventional Resources, Hydraulic Fracturing, Water Management and Insights for Middle Eastern Reservoirs
  • Time :

Abstract

Water has been regarded as one of most important resources in the industrial sector and plays a pivotal role in the hydrocarbon industry. With modern advancements in technology, enhanced agricultural production and urbanization, numerous regions across the globe are currently facing water stress. Coupled with rapid population growth and energy demands, it is imperative to understand the influence of water resources within the hydrocarbon industry and examine current water management strategies. It is a need of the hour to enhance current strategies to source water more efficiently, especially within water scarce regions such as the Middle East.
Unconventional resources have significantly contributed to the modern energy market. However, extraction of hydrocarbon from unconventional reservoirs is heavily water-intensive as compared to conventional reservoirs. This comprehensive investigation analyzes key design parameters that affect productivity within typical Middle Eastern shale gas reservoirs. In addition, simple constrained cases were constructed to better understand the influence of these parameters with respect to the overall production and water requirement. Furthermore, potential regional challenges along with resource management strategies are also highlighted.

Biography

Dr. Rahman is an associate professor and has been teaching and conducting research since 2002 and has PhD in Petroleum Engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia. He published over 70 articles in the area of well stimulation, specifically in hydraulic fracturing, acid fracturing, and enhanced/improved oil and gas recovery and produced two patents. He was/is investigator of several external and internal funded research projects (funded by Abu Dhabi National Oil Company and Khalifa University). He served as technical committee member for several SPE conferences and workshops.

  • Federal Scientific Center of Hygiene Named After F.F. Erisman, Russia.
  • Title:Influence of dissolved natural organic substances on the processes of sorption-desorption of metals and radionuclides in a freshwater ecosystem.
  • Time :

Abstract

The processes of abiogenic (water) migration of substances with gravitational moisture flows are studied based on information about the soil cover structure, as well as on a number of methodological principles: complementarity, consistency, agility and targeting of processes, structural organization of substances in space-time and filtration heterogeneity. Humification contributes to the formation of a repository of biological information and energy in soils and bottom sediments. Climatic conditions determine the creation and functioning of dynamic, non- equilibrium and self-organized systems of various genesis in the soils.
The aim of this research is to study the contribution of humic substances to metal migration, including radionuclides, at the border of bottom sediments and water flow.
During the experiment with addition of dissolved humic acid, the following was established. The introduction of organic carbon into the system with bottom sediments containing a significant number of radionuclides contributed to the transition of the sought radionuclides to a soluble state with a further release into the aqueous medium. This property was especially noted for such radionuclides as 152Eu and 241Am, the content of which, in the aqueous medium for 350 days from the experiment initiation and 333 days after the introduction of water-soluble organic carbon into the aqueous medium, was 198±8 Bq•L-1 and 167±7 Bq•L-1, respectively. The content of other radionuclides (40K, 60Co, 137Cs) was not so significant (Bq•L-1): 6.3±1.0, 26.5±1.5, 10.1±0.9, respectively.
The obtained results were based on the physicochemical properties of radionuclides, in particular the high affinity of 40K, 137Cs for crystalline structures that make up bottom sediments whereas 152Eu and 241Am preferably bind to the organic matter of bottom sediments forming potentially migrating speciation.

Biography

Lydia Bondareva Federal Scientific Centre of Hygiene named after F. F. Erisman, Mytishchi, Moscow Region, Russian Federation. Research and Academic Experience: Ph.D. in Chemistry (1994), Association Professor (2011). Research Area: Environmental safety (food and feed, water, soil, air), analytical identification of contamination, biological monitoring. Number of Published papers: 178.

  • Foundation for Studies and Research on International Development, France
  • Title:The Physical Vulnerability to Climate Change Index: An Index to Be Used for International Policy
  • Time :

Abstract

Recent years have seen a sharp increase in the production of indices of vulnerability to climate change. Most of these indices of vulnerability to climate change have been primarily used for awareness-raising purposes rather than for guiding international policy. The Physical Vulnerability to Climate Change Index (PVCCI) proposed in this paper has been designed as an index of exogenous vulnerability, not influenced by the present policy of the countries concerned. As such it can be used as a criterion for guiding the international allocation of concessional resources (in particular those devoted to adaptation), as well as for the identification of the countries that are most vulnerable for structural or physical reasons. The index has been calculated for 191 countries. LDCs, SIDS, and African countries have a higher average score. However, there is a wide disparity in PVCCI scores within these three groups of countries, implying that a country-by-country allocation of resources should be used rather than an allocation by country group. The findings appear to be robust after comparison of various options.

Biography

Sosso Feindouno has received his Ph.D. in Development Economics from the CERDI (University Clermont-Auvergne) and his Masters in Economics and Statistics from Toulouse School of Economics in France. Currently, he is a Research Officer at Fondation pour les Études et Recherches sur le Développement International (FERDI) and works on issues related to vulnerability and fragility (economic, socio-political, environmental) of developing countries, including their measurement through the construction and refinement of composite indicators.

  • Polytechnic Institute Cavado Ave, Portugal
  • Title:Integration of Management Systems towards Sustainable Development.
  • Time :

Abstract

The integration of Management Systems (MS) within companies, namely, environmental management integrated with other management areas, such as, quality, corporate social responsability, energy and occupational health and safety, among others, is currently considered a strategic way towards sustainable development through lean and clean production, taking into account that resources are limited. Hence, sustainable development (SD) can be achieved through a better coordinated management of production processes versus associated resources, where it is of primordial importance the integration of environment with lean philosophy, that is, the designated lean green.
This presentation aims to highlight the main benefits of integrating the various management systems in organizations towards sustainable development. It addresses issues regarding the contributions resulting from the integration of various standardized MS, from both internal and external perspectives of organizations. Complementing the overall review of aspects to the development of integrated management systems, various works were conducted in order to identify and better understand the relevance of the success factors. An innovative model of integrated management systems towards sustainable development considering the Triple Bottom Line (economic, social and environmental) will be presented.
A proactive approach and commitment to resource savings and cleaner production supported by an integrated management system, brings relevant benefits for organizations in particular, and for humanity in general.

Biography

Gilberto Santos is Professor at the Polytechnic Institute Cávado Ave (IPCA), Barcelos, Portugal, where he founded a master’s course on “Integrated Management Systems QES (Quality, Environment and Safety) and was the director of it for 7th editions. He holds an Aggregation (DSc) title in Industrial Engineering from de New University of Lisbon and a PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Minho University, Portugal. He participates as a Speaker in several national and international conferences and is the author of several publications, reviewer for International Journals. Author’s ORCID: 0000-0001-9268-3272. Scopus: https://www.scopus.com/authid/detail.uri?authorId=7102014623
E-mail: gsantos@ipca.pt

  • 1Northumbria University , United Kingdom
  • Title:An Advance Air-Conditioning System for Future Sustainability (UN-SDG#13)
  • Time :

Abstract

The electricity consumed by the ACs will grow up to 3 fold by 2050 and it will be second largest electricity consumer after industrial sector. Over 95% of current cooling market is covered by conventional chillers because of advantages such as reliability and high performance. On the other hand, they have many disadvantages such as high maintenance cost, chemical refrigerants utilization, noise and vibration issues. Montreal Protocol and Europe Council Directive (3093/94) forced to stop the production of chemical based refrigerants and planned to eliminate completely by 2030.
In order to meet the cooling demand for human comfort and specially growing data center requirement, out-of-box solutions are required urgently. We proposed a disruptive cooling technology called water droplet indirect evaporative cooler (WD-IEC). It devoid the use of mechanical vapor compressors (MVC), chemical-based (chlorofluorocarbons) refrigerants, cooling towers, chilled and cooling water pipes, that eliminates more than 75% of conventional infrastructure of mechanical or thermally driven chillers. The proposed system utilizes only clean water for heat removal through evaporative potential of air. The initial results shows that the overall specific energy consumption can be reduced to 0.55±0.05 kWelectric per Refrigeration ton (Rton) from the conventional level of 0.85±0.05 kW/Rton. The other advantages includes; (i) zero global warming potential, (ii) three times less water consumption, (iii) maintenance cost is only 10% as compared to conventional chillers and (iv)simple and reliable operation. We also designed and fabricated 1 & 5 Rton commercial units those are under testing in real conditions and producing excellent results.

Biography

Dr. Shahzad is working as a Sr. Lecturer in Mechanical and Construction Engineering Department at Northumbria University (NU), Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom. He worked as a Research Scientist in the Water Desalination and Reuse Center of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology from 2014-2019 before joining NU, UK.
He is working in cooling, hybrid desalination processes and renewable energy research. He won many international awards including, Sustainability Medal 2020, Global Innovation Award 2020, National Energy Globe Award Saudi Arabia 2020 and 2019, Excellence and Leadership Award 2019, IDA Environmental & Sustainability Award 2019. His research was highlighted at Yahoo business, Nature Middle East, Arab News and many other national and international platforms. He successfully commercialized his cooling and desalination processes through spin-off companies.
Dr. Shahzad holds 7 international patents. To date, he published 2 books, 15 book chapters, over 50 peer-reviewed journal papers and more than 100 conference papers. He also received three best paper awards in international conferences. He is an editorial board member of NATURE Applied Science journal and serving as a Guest Editor for topical collections. He is also selected as a regional coordinator for International Desalination Association Young Leader Program (IDA-YLP) for Middle East & Africa region. He is a member of many professional organizations namely; International Desalination Association (IDA), The International Water Association (IWA) and American Society of Mechanical Engineer (ASME).
https://researchportal.northumbria.ac.uk/en/researchers/muhammad-wakil-shahzad(85b5a7af-8e8d-4ddc-8682-d1d0b84fe25f).html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pDdfGqtAMU

  • Federal University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:The Classic Aqua Regia and EPA 3051A Methods can Mislead Environmental Assessments and Certifications: Potentially Harmful Elements Resorption in Short-range Order Materials
  • Time :

Abstract

EPA 3051A and Aqua Regia (AR) are widely adopted by global environmental agencies to assess soil quality in relation to potentially harmful elements (PHE). However, previous study has shown the formation of large amounts of short-range order materials (SRO) in the residues of these extractions. Residues obtained from the 3051A and AR were recovered from filter papers. To characterize the SRO in these residues, sequential extractions were performed with 0.2 mol L-1 ammonium oxalate (AO) and 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH. On average (n = 15), the 3051A and AR residues contained 37% and 60% of SRO, respectively. The largest amounts of SRO formed in the AR residue was in sample 5 (99% of SRO). The main component of the SRO was Al2O3-AO, Fe2O3-AO and SiO2-NaOH. The formation of SRO and PHE resorption levels were random and highly dependent on the mineralogy of the soil clay fraction. Soils rich in smectites, which are more common in temperate regions, formed larger amounts of SRO. The association of Pb with the SRO was more pronounced in the 3051A residue than in the AR residue. If SRO was not extracted after 3051A, in sample 7, for example, 595 mg kg-1 of Pb (10.2%) would have not been accounted. The maximum PHE resorptions in SRO were (%): Pb – 10; Cu – 470; Ba – 280; As – 21. The underestimation of PHE contents due to resorption mechanisms may lead an environmental agency to certify the use of an area contaminated with PHE.

Biography

Vander Freitas Melo is graduated in Agronomic Engineering, master and doctor in Soils and Plant Nutrition from the Federal University of Viçosa and University of Reading (UK) and post-doctor from The University of Western Australia. Since 1999 he is professor at Federal University of Paraná, Brazil. He was editor of the Soil Chemistry and Mineralogy book, published by the Brazilian Soil Science Society. He works in the field of soil chemistry and mineralogy, with recent works on soil pollution by heavy metals and pesticides, phosphorus fixation processes in clay fraction minerals and study of soil traces for forensic purposes.

  • Oakland University, United States of America
  • Title:Optimal Supply Chain Design for First and Second Generation Bioethanol by Considering Energy Consumption, Market Incentives and Carbon Policies.
  • Time :

Abstract

Increasing demand for energy, environmental issue related to using fossil fuels, are driving bioethanol supply chain decision-makers to motivate biorefineries in using second-generation biomass feedstocks while reducing their carbon emissions. Implementing different carbon policies to control carbon emissions plays a vital role in planning bioethanol supply chains.
This study introduces a supply chain modeling approach that first locates the bioethanol plants in the State of North Dakota using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis and then maximizes the profit of first and second generation bioethanol supply chains while considering the effects of different carbon policies (carbon tax, carbon cap, carbon cap-and-trade, and carbon offset) and monetary incentives on the supply chain decisions. The results show that the penalties for carbon emissions and energy consumption change the selection of birefineries in addressing in state and out of state demands in ways to maximize the profit of a bioethanol supply chain. The land rental cost is also highly influential in the selection of supply sources unless emissions or energy consumption are penalized. To switch to the second-generation bioethanol technology, a minimum incentive of $0.204/liter and $0.167/liter of bioethanol are needed to switch from corn-based to corn-stover-based and switchgrass-based bioethanol supply chains, respectively. Finally, carbon cap-and-trade is the best carbon policy since it causes the lowest profit loss (31.5%) and the highest reduction in emissions (up to 1.98%)

Biography

Dr Sobhani is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Decision and Information Sciences at Oakland University’s School of Business. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from Ryerson University-Toronto. Dr. Sobhani’s research focuses on the application of operations research techniques and data analytics to problems in operations system performance modeling, and supply chain management. He has a couple of publications in Operations Research/Management Science and Energy related journals such as European Journal of Operational Research, Energy Policy and Applied Energy.

  • Beirut Arab University, Lebanon
  • Title:Heavy Metals Accumulation Effects on the Photosynthetic Performance of Geophytes in Mediterranean Reserve.
  • Time :

Abstract

In Bentael natural reserve, Byblos-Lebanon, a recently constructed road, adjacent to its Southside, is threatening the wildlife of the reserve. The first source of this pollution is a vehicle derived contamination of soil, air and plants. This study determines heavy metals contamination levels evaluated by a rare plant species ‘‘Urginea maritima”, which is used as a biomonitor of airborne pollution. Four heavy metals were chosen for their toxic effects on the floral species. Lead, cadmium, aluminium and chromium were studied in plant leaves. The analysis of heavy metals is completed by a measurement of the photosynthetic activity of the plant. Two years period study showed lead upgrade in leaves versus a chromium decrease of plant uptake from the first year of road inauguration. Aluminium and cadmium levels increase for the first months after road works beginning then decreased sharply. As for photosynthetic pigments, the study showed an adverse effect of heavy metals on ordinary photosynthetic activities of the plants. Chlorophyll revealed primarily a decline in activities the first year but then amplification, in contrast of pheophytin which concentrations displayed a sharp rise especially in the most closely site to the road. These results indicated that landscape activities near natural reserves initiate heavy metals pollution for plants with a high risk of accumulation.

Biography

Tarek Houri received his Ph.D. in 2012 from the Auvergne University – France and M.S. in Animal Physiology, Biomolecules & Therapeutics in 2007 from the University of François Rabelais, Tours – France. He obtained his B.S. in Biology from Beirut Arab University in 2006. He is Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Beirut Arab University.

  • Poznan University of Life Sciences ,Poland.
  • Title:Terpenes in Conifers Under Developmental and Environmental Stimuli
  • Time :

Abstract

Among a wide variety of natural compounds synthesized by conifer trees, terpenes seem to be the most important group of secondary metabolites. They are a vital part of constitutive or induced defense mechanisms to protect the plant from invading pathogens and herbivore. Furthermore, they can take part in chemo-ecological interactions with co-evolved insects, e.g. bark beetles. Some of terpenes are known to manifest antioxidant properties which may contribute to their role in overcoming oxidative stress. It has been also suggested that
volatile compounds such as terpenes can be involved in interplant signaling, especially concerning biotic or mechanical stress. Numerous studies have shown that abiotic and biotic stress factors such as drought, temperature fluctuations, air and soil pollution or pathogen attack may affect the biosynthesis and emission of terpenes, and the response may depend on the stressor type and stress intensity. Although the general composition of terpenes is characteristic for each species, it has been shown that it can even differ between two individual trees, depending on tree chemotype. Despite many comprehensive studies in this area, the role of terpenes in plants is not completely understood. Some of the available results are contradictory. Here we present an overview of recent literature in this area to systematize the observed changes in terpene quantity and quality in conifer trees. The study is focused on three most important forest-forming conifer genera of European temperate climate zone – pine (Pinus sp.), spruce (Picea sp.) and fir (Abies sp.) due to their high utility and wide range of occurrence. Moreover, we tried to shed light on a complex function of these interesting compounds in view of progressive climate change.

Biography

Biologist, PhD student at Poznan University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Utilization, in cooperation with the Department of Plant Ecophysiology at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Faculty of Biology. Her current work focuses specifically on molecular and biochemical aspects of xylem formation in conifer trees.

  • State University Center of the West Zone, Brazil
  • Title:Phthalates in Avicennia Schaueriana, a Mangrove Species, in the State Biological Reserve, Guaratiba, RJ, Brazil
  • Time :

Abstract
Phthalates are the most common plasticizer compounds worldwide, providing flexibility to a wide array of plastic products. The inadequate disposal of these chemical residues causes their absorption and accumulation by plant species in contaminated environments. The absorption and accumulation of phthalates in the mangrove species Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae) were monitored over one year. A total of 30 fresh and dried leaf extract samples were collected through the “serapilheira system”, in the Guaratiba Biological Reserve in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in three different regions of the Guaratiba mangrove forest: A (fringe), C (basin), and E (transition). Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Bis-tridecyl phthalate was the main contaminant detected, and bis- isobutyl phthalate and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate were the major metabolites of the butanolic fraction obtained from the liquid-liquid partition of the ethanolic leaf extract. The observed chemical profile was rich in secondary metabolites, predominantly lupeol and 𝛼-amyrin. Exposure to these contaminants presents several risks to human health. This is the first work to confirm how the mangrove pollution process, through the accumulation of plastic contaminants in sediments and water, can directly affect the plant species and their biosynthesis.
Biography
Catharina Eccard Fingolo is professor in the Pharmacy Course and Postgraduate Program in Environmental Science and Technology at the Centro Universitário Estadual da Zona Oeste – UEZO, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She works with environmental sciences, with emphasis on environmental contaminants of mangrove ecosystem, analysis of chemical markers, and biological activities of the mangrove species: Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle. She has doctorate degree in Chemistry of Natural Products and master degree in Plant Biotechnology from the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  • Geophysical Institute of Peru,Peru.
  • Title:On the Dynamic Mechanisms of Intense Rainfall Events in the Central Andes of Peru, Mantaro Valley
  • Time :

Abstract
The present study was aimed at analyzing the main atmospheric dynamic mechanisms associated with the occurrence of intense rainfall events above the Huancayo observatory (12.05°S, 75.32°W, 3313 m asl) in the central Andes of Perú (Mantaro valley) from January 2018 to April 2019. To identify the rainfall events, we used a set of instruments from the laboratory of physics, microphysics and radiation (LAMAR) composed by in-situ pluviometric observations, satellite remote sensing data (GPM), Cloud Radar (MIRA- 35c), Boundary Layer Tropospheric Radar (BLTR) and downscaling model simulations with WRF (resolutions: 18 km, 6 km and 2 km) and ARPS (0.5 km) models to analyze the dynamics of the atmosphere for the synoptic, meso and local processes that control the occurrence of these rainfall events. The results showed that all intense rainfall events are associated with the presence of thermal meso-scale circulations that transport moisture fluxes through passes with gentle slopes along both sides of the Andes. The easterly moisture fluxes come in from the South America Low Level Jet (SALLJ) and the westerly moisture fluxes from the Pacific Ocean. The arrival of these moisture flows to regions within the Mantaro valley depends on their coupling with the circulations at medium and high levels of the atmosphere. At the synoptic scale, the results show that the rainfall events can be separated into two groups: the first one associated with westerly circulations (WC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the weakening and eastern displacement of the anticyclonic Bolivian high-North east low (BH-NE) system, and the second associated with easterly circulations (EC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the intensification of the BH-NE system. The observed and simulated results showed that multicell convective systems of WC events are more extensive and deeper than EC events. This situation can be explained as the convergence of moisture fluxes from opposite directions occurred within the Mantaro basin for WC events. In contrast, for EC events, the convergence develops at the east Andes mountain range, following which the multicell storm system propagates westward, driven by easterly circulations. The EC events occur mostly in the summer months, while the WC events occur mostly in the autumn and spring months. Moreover, apparently the inertia gravity waves (IGWs) formed in the Amazon basin transport moisture and energy to the central Andes plateau and intensify the convection processes.

Biography
Graduated in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Meteorology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). Doctor in atmospheric sciences by the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Sao Paulo (IAG-USP). He has experience in the areas of Physics and Geosciences, with emphasis on Quantum Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, acting mainly on the following topics: Quantum Optics, Solar and Terrestrial Radiation, Meso Meteorology and Microscale and Earth Physics.

  • Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:On the Development Of a Simplified Model For Thermal Comfort Control of Split Systems
  • Time :

ABSTRACT
Despite split-type systems for cooling purposes became popular in countries such as China, Japan. India, Indonesia and Brazil, their use commonly promote high gradients of both temperature and air velocity in rooms which may cause considerable thermal discomfort. Hence, this work aims at developing a simplified thermal comfort index, based on temperature and air speed, in order to develop controllers for those types of air conditioning systems, replacing the traditional on-off temperature set-point control by an effective and inexpensive thermal-comfort based control. The work is focused on the assessment of comfort in classrooms by carrying out measurements according to ISO 7730 and ASHRAE 55 Standards, which defines the thermal satisfaction in occupied environments based on the PMV index. Specifically, the speed, temperature and relative humidity of the air and the mean radiant temperature of the room were measured at eight positions within the space. The field experiments were performed considering two 10.5-kW cooling capacity appliances installed in different positions relatively to the layout of the room, considering three levels of supply airflow (high, medium and low) and three set-point temperatures (23, 24 and 25 °C). An analysis of uncertainties is presented for PMV measurements and a regression analysis was applied to the measured data to determine a simplified correlation between thermal comfort (by means of the PMV index) air temperature and air velocity, aiming at developing afterwards a control device based on thermal comfort instead of temperature setpoint only. Results are shown in terms of distribution of air speed, air temperature and PMV index for the two configurations of equipment installation, as well as the resulting empirical model correlating thermal comfort index with both temperature and air speed. In addition, thermal comfort opinions from a survey are contrasted with the simplified thermal comfort model.

  • Polytechnic University of Catalonia,Spain.
  • Title:Reduction of Textile Microfibers’ Pollution: A New Filter Device For the Domestic Washing
  • Time :

Abstract

All textile articles detach microfibers when their washing process takes place. These microfibers (max. diameter 5 mm, length/diameter ratio 3:1) are considered as microplastics when the textile polymer has a non-natural origin. Some alternatives for the reduction of this pollution have been studied and proposed. Specifically, these include treatments for textile articles, devices for washing machines, and the microfibers’ removal efficiency in water treatment plants.
The treatment of textile articles in their manufacturing process, such as the application of coating materials, has the advantage that the generation of microfibers can be reduced at the source. However, it could be difficult to scale-up, as there are countless textile industries around the world, with many of them located in developing countries. Besides, there are different properties that the textile articles must fulfill (e.g., comfortability), which could be reduced when a coat is applied. Also, most of the synthetic fibers produced nowadays are made of polyester, a quite inert polymeric material hard to undergo consistent and durable treatments. Likewise, careful consideration must be put on the materials studied for these alternatives, as these could still generate another type of contamination.
On the other hand, water treatment plant facilities are usually very efficient in retaining microfibers. However, the global percentage of treated water is very low (20%) and the investment costs for constructing new facilities is very high. Besides, large volumes of washers’ effluents are routinely generated, which means that the number of microfibers that get through is still important. Moreover, as the microfibers are transferred to the sludge, these can still be release to the environment when compost is used as a by-product. Hence, these facilities are hitherto an unfeasible option in the short term.
Finally, the application of filter devices on washing machines is evaluated as a feasible option. These have the advantage of easiness to install and almost no extra energy supply requirements. In addition, there are easy to implement as the number of washing machine’s industries is relatively short. In this case, the final disposition of the microfibers is a subject that also needs to be approached.
In this work, a scalable and feasible device developed to catch these microfibers is presented. The device functions as a removable filter attached to the effluent of the washing machine. Moreover, the final disposal challenge is also considered. In this way, results of a post-treatment for the retention of microfibers are evaluated.

Biography
Francisco Belzagui, PhD Student at Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Chemical Engineer, MSc in Environmental Engineering, MSc in Renewable Energies and Energetic Sustainability.

  • Federico II University of Naples, Italy.
  • Title:Occupational Exposures to Rare Earth Elements (REEs): Current knowledge, On-Going Studies and Research Prospects
  • Time :

Abstract
Compared to the growing body of literature on REE-associated toxicity in a number of biota, relatively scarce reports are available on the effects of human occupational REE exposures. Early studies reported on the adverse effects of REE aerosol or dust, as case reports of respiratory damage in movie operators or lens grinders. More recent studies of occupational REE exposures were carried out on miners and on workers manufacturing cerium and lanthanum oxide, with reports of increased hair REE levels vs. controls, dysregulation of protein expression, and increased urinary REE levels vs. controls. A study of occupational exposures to REEs and other metals in e-waste processing was focused on the prevalence of anemia. The levels of REEs and other metals were found higher in anemic vs. non-anemic workers, suggesting that the higher REE and metal levels in anemic workers could play a role in the development of anemia.
Beyond the previously published studies, the currently widespread use of REEs in an extensive range of technologies raises environmental concern for occupational REE exposures including, among others, in the petrochemical industry and car repair due to the use of La in oil refining and of Ce for catalytic additives in diesel fuel production. We have an on-going study of REE levels in mechanic workshops, aimed at evaluating the effects of REE-containing diesel exhaust particulate matter among exposed workers. The current results point to different REE content on the workshop floor related to different exhaust abatement devices, as well as increased REE levels in urine of mechanics vs. controls. Whether, or not, REE excretion is accompanied by hair accumulation is a matter of on-going investigation.
Other subjects of investigation following occupational REE exposures, such as production of REE-containing super magnets for wind turbines and for hybrid engines, warrant ad hoc research efforts.

Biography
Giovanni Pagano (GP) has been active for 40 years in studies of the adverse effects of several xenobiotics and complex mixtures. After retiring from the Italian National Cancer Institute in Naples, GP has remained active in international research activities. To date GP is committed as a Research Contractor at the Department of Chemical Sciences, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy. The subject of this presentation – REEs – has been investigated within an international research team, since an early paper in 2010.

  • Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • Title:The Epidemiology of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Japan: Findings from a Nationwide Multi-Center Survey
  • Time :

Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the current epidemiology of DDH using a comprehensive nationwide survey in Japan. A questionnaire was sent to orthopedic surgeons in 1,987 facilities nationwide. A total of 783 (39%) facilities completed and returned the card of DDH. Of these, 79% reported no cases of DDH-related dislocation over the 2-year period, while the remaining facilities reported 1,295 cases.
The characteristics of children diagnosed with DDH-related dislocation were as follows: girls (89%), left side involvement (69%), bilateral involvement (4%), positive family history (27%), first-born (53%), and pelvic position at birth (15%). Seasonal variation showed an increase in DDH incidence among those born in the winter. Overall, 199 cases (15%) were diagnosed at >1 year of age, and these included 36 cases diagnosed very late, at >3 years of age. The majority of the 199 cases of late diagnosis had received earlier routine screening at <1 year of age. The characteristics of the children diagnosed with DDH nationwide were similar to past data from local regions. However, many children were diagnosed late (>1 year of age), particularly in the more populous regions. The findings identify a need for improved early routine screening for DDH in Japan.
Biography
Education
1980 Graduated from Shinsyu University School of Medicine , Nagano, Japan
Professional career
1987-1998 Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
1998-2003 Aichi Prefectural Colony, Central Hospital, Kasugai, Japan
2003-2020 Aichi Children’s Health and Medical Center (ACHMC), Obu, Japan
Society Memberships
Japanese Pediatric Orthopedic Society
Executive-Director (2013~2018), Congress president (2020)
Japanese Society of Orthopedic Ultrasonics
Executive-Director (1995~2016), President (2017~)

  • Delhi Technological University,India
  • Title:Modelling and Simulation of Cathode Material for 2D Lithium-ion Solid-State Battery
  • Time :

Abstract

This work has been presented to develop a simulation model of 2D Lithium-ion Solid State Battery (SSB) for studying the thermal and electrical characteristics by varying the thickness of the electrode. This simulation model helps us to explore the cathode material characteristics to optimize lithium-ion SSB’s performance. In this paper, the simulation model has been formulated with 2D domain geometry and also encapsulated with variable parameters on a Multiphysics software. The electrochemical model was also formed with the help of mathematical modeling equations to obtain the rate capability of the li-ion SSB. This simulation model study shows the good thermal stability of the cathode material with a varied temperature range from 0⸰C to 150⸰C. Moreover, the electrical and electrochemical results also show good electrochemical reactivity, proper diffusion of li-ions, and good transport properties in the positive electrode of the li-ion SSB. Furthermore, this simulation approach shows a proper discharge curve at various C-rates and also highlights the concentration of li-ion, electrons, and heat flux with good stability in the Lithium-ion SSB.

Biography
Snigdha Sharma has always been interested in the field of energy storage devices, taking into account the batteries, supercapacitors, and many more. She received a bachelor’s degree (B. Tech) in electrical and electronics engineering from Gautam Buddha Technical University, India, and a master’s degree (M. Tech) in Power system engineering from Gautam Buddha University, India. Currently, I am in Delhi Technological University, New Delhi, India. She strengthened her expertise in lithium-ion batteries in which she is having a handful command on simulation software as wells as experimental work for various applications such as Electric Vehicles, Automations, Grids, and Battery back-up systems.

  • CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation ,India
  • Title:Graphene and Graphene Like Nano-Dimensioned Materials for Diagnostic Applications
  • Time :

Abstract

Graphene, the wonder material is just one of the many 2-D materials that have been discovered now. In constant efforts to improve the properties of the graphene, many new graphene-like materials have been developed such as graphane, fluorographene, white graphene, and various other forms of graphene (oxides, quantum dots, ribbons, coils, pillars and fibers). These graphene like or graphene based materials are the most studied and researched because of their excellent optical and electronic behavior as both these properties are of utmost importance while considering diagnostic applications. These have been used as biosensing platforms, anti-cancer agents, cell imaging and in photo-thermal applications, along with many other applications. For our applications, we explored graphene and graphene like nano-dimensioned materials as immobilization matrix for detection of anemia biomarkers, and cardiac biomarkers. These materials not only provide matrix but also facilitate fast reactions due their catalytic property which ultimately helps in signal amplification.

Biography

Suman Singh is working as Principal Scientist in CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation (CSIR-CSIO), Chandigarh, India. She is also a faculty of chemistry (Associate Professor) at Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR) at CSIR-CSIO, Chandigarh. Her lab is engaged in developing Advanced Bio-Chemo sensors for Diagnostic & Environment Monitoring using advanced nanomaterials and their composites. Her group has also expertise in developing opto-electrochemical platforms like screen printed electrodes, optical chips, thin film deposition, paper devices, microfluidic devices, etc. She has been a regular recipient of funding from various agencies like DST-India, DBT-India, CSIR, ICMR. Her work is published in many reputed SCI journals of high impact factor and has many book chapters to her credit. She is co-faculty advisor to Student Chapter of American Chemical Society at CSIR-CSIO/AcSIR. She is life member of many scientific societies.

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