Day1

  • Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • Title:The Epidemiology of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Japan: Findings from a Nationwide Multi-Center Survey
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the current epidemiology of DDH using a comprehensive nationwide survey in Japan. A questionnaire was sent to orthopedic surgeons in 1,987 facilities nationwide. A total of 783 (39%) facilities completed and returned the card of DDH. Of these, 79% reported no cases of DDH-related dislocation over the 2-year period, while the remaining facilities reported 1,295 cases.
The characteristics of children diagnosed with DDH-related dislocation were as follows: girls (89%), left side involvement (69%), bilateral involvement (4%), positive family history (27%), first-born (53%), and pelvic position at birth (15%). Seasonal variation showed an increase in DDH incidence among those born in the winter. Overall, 199 cases (15%) were diagnosed at >1 year of age, and these included 36 cases diagnosed very late, at >3 years of age. The majority of the 199 cases of late diagnosis had received earlier routine screening at <1 year of age. The characteristics of the children diagnosed with DDH nationwide were similar to past data from local regions. However, many children were diagnosed late (>1 year of age), particularly in the more populous regions. The findings identify a need for improved early routine screening for DDH in Japan.
Biography
Dr. Tadashi Hattori 1980 Graduated from Shinsyu University School of Medicine , Nagano, Japan
Professional career
1987-1998 Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan
1998-2003 Aichi Prefectural Colony, Central Hospital, Kasugai, Japan
2003-2020 Aichi Children’s Health and Medical Center (ACHMC), Obu, Japan
Society Memberships
Japanese Pediatric Orthopedic Society
Executive-Director (2013~2018), Congress president (2020)
Japanese Society of Orthopedic Ultrasonics
Executive-Director (1995~2016), President (2017~)

  • Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE), South Korea
  • Title:The Process Development of Liquid Air Energy Storage System (LAES)
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Abstract
The development of long-term energy storage is more important today than ever because intermittent renewable energy source, such as wind and solar photovoltaic are growing rapidly in power generation market. Therefore, the demand on a bulk storage system is expected to increase significantly as result of renewable energy policy. The compressed air energy storage and liquid air energy storage system are an innovative technology for commercial grid scale energy storage. Especially liquid air energy storage system is expected to overcome the drawbacks of pumped hydro storage and compressed air energy storage. The proposed system is a novel stand-alone LAES system to enhance Round-Trip Efficiency (RTE) using a sensible heat store of packed bed type and latent heat store unit. The cryogenic Phase Change Material (PCM) melts at 110K based on experimental result, making it possible to provide cold enerrgy at a constant temperature for air liquefaction. The analysis shows that the implementation of energy recycling from the compressor and cold thermal store leads to a high RTE than conventional LAES system.

Biography
Ju-Yeol Ryu received B.S degree in dept. Of mechanical eng. from Yeungnam University in 2010 and MSc in mechanical eng. from Sungkyunkwan University in 2021. He worked Samsung C&T Corporation for 6 years since 2010 as basic design process engineer. He is currently a senior researcher at Institute for Advanced Engineering(IAE). He research focues on long-term mechanical Energy Storage System(ESS) to supply power energy stably such as Liquid Air Energy Storage(LAES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES).

  • University of Magallanes, Chile
  • Title:Status of Atlantic Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) Aquaculture Production Technology in Chile
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Abstract
The European aquaculture industry began to undertake Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) aquaculture in the 1980s due to the favorable growth rate and high market value of this cold-water marine fish. Atlantic halibut cultivation began in Chile in 1996 in the Magallanes region (53 ̊S). Chilean aquaculture facilities were finally equipped to begin rearing Atlantic halibut after 12 years and a total investment of $ 2 million USD. Infrastructure is now in place to manage the entire production cycle, including broodstock rearing, egg incubation, larval rearing (yolk-sac stage, first-feeding), weaning, the nursery stage, on-growing in land-based tanks, harvest, and marketing. The hatchery phase to produce 10-g juveniles requires 10–12 months, followed by an approximately 30-month grow-out phase in land-based tanks to produce 3-kg fish. Further research and development are being performed in nutrition (diet formulation), genetics (selection for disease resistance and growth rate), fish health, and environmental issues to support the development of a sustainable marine aquaculture industry for this species.

Biography
Dr. Pablo Gallardo Ojeda currently an Associate Professor at the University of Magallanes, Director of the Department of Agricultural and Aquacultural Sciences, Director of the Bahía Laredo Marine Research Center and Institutional Representative to FONDEF-ANID. During his professional development (24 years) he have formulated, directed and participated in almost thirty Aquaculture R&D projects, both for fish, mollusks, algae, echinoderms and crustaceans, directing work groups, both professionally and support and leveraging nearly US$ 5 million in pecuniary resources from competitive funds. he have participated in 19 publications and 9 scientific congresses, in Chile and abroad. Annually, he teach 6 level subjects; technical, undergraduate and postgraduate and he have directed 14 theses and professional practices of students of Marine Biology, Aquaculture Engineering and Aquatic Resources Technicians. In addition, he participate in the Technical Scientific Committee for Land Management of Aquaculture and the Recreational Fishing Committee of the Magallanes region, both belonging to the Undersecretary of Fisheries and Aquaculture of Chile Government and the Ethics Committee of the University of Magallanes.

  • Pusan National University , Republic of Korea
  • Title:Vertically Aligned CoMoS Nanosheet on PANI Nanowire as an Excellent Electrocatalysts for Water Splitting
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Abstract
To achieve an efficient conversion of renewable energy sources through water splitting, low-cost, efficient, and eco-friendly catalysts are required for oxygen and hydrogen evolution. Here, we develop a vertically aligned cobalt molybdenum sulfide (CoMoS) nanosheets on a conductive polyaniline (PANI) nanowire on nickel foam (NF) by a one-step solvothermal synthesis. The macroporous nickel foam improve the carry of the O2 gas evolved, and vertically aligned CoMoS nanosheets on a three-dimensional PANI nanowire substrate form a hybrid architecture, promoting electrolyte penetration and the removal of gas bubbles, enabling firm touch between reactants and active sites, and generating smooth pathways for effective charge transport in the conductive channels. The hybrid CoMoS-PANI requires only 250 and 98 mV, to achieve a current density of 10 mA cm–2 in 1 M KOH, for the oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions, respectively. As an electrode for overall water splitting, CoMoS-PANI/NF, as both the anode and the cathode, shows a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a low cell voltage, 1.58 V. Moreover, it possessed excellent durability during the 50 h stability test, suggests that CoMoS-PANI is an efficient and stable bifunctional catalyst. The upgraded electrocatalytic activity of CoMoS-PANI can be attributed to the synergistic interaction between Co, Mo, S, and PANI. First, the CoMoS nanosheets were grown on conductive PANI nanowire substrate as hybrid architectures, encouraging electrolyte piercing and the removal of gases, enabling strong contact between and reactants and active sites, and creating a smooth pathway for effective charge transportion. Second, the defect rich structure, S vacancies centered in the CoMoS nanosheet structure, and amines in the PANI nanowire create a high electrochemically active surface area and a large number of active sites, expose active interfaces, and maintain the conductivity. Finally, the effective inter-electron transfer between cobalt and molybdenum and the intra-electron transfer between PANI and CoMoS reduce the kinetic energy barrier of initial water dissociation and ion adsorption. Thus, these factors resulted in excellent augmented performance for OER, HER, and overall water splitting. This work creates a promising step towards the synthesis of hybrid materials as excellent electrocatalysts for renewable energy generation.

Biography

Dr. Sobin Mathew is Ph.D research fellow in Pusan National University, Division of Material science and engineering
Topics : Hybrid Materials, Water splitting, Electrochemistry, Hydrogen Fuel Cell.

  • University of Sakarya, Turkey
  • Title:Investigation of Poultry Slaughterhouse Waste Stream to Produce Biofuel for Internal Utilization
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Abstract
Poultry slaughterhouses generate an abattoir sludge (PAS) that needs proper management in the principles of circular economy and green deal goals that imply a net-zero emissions, more resource efficient and sustainable economy. This study proposes a waste-to-energy approach as a sustainable strategy for water heating by utilizing waste stream and internal usage in poultry slaughterhouse sector. In the study, energy crop Arundo donax (AD) biomass produced by irrigating treated abattoir waste water and solar dried PAS were used to produce bio pellet for the boiler heater. The solar dried PAS and grinded AD straw were extruded into pellets using a real industrial press at biomass combustion plants using i) 100% PAS:0% AD, ii) 50% PAS:50% AD, iii) 0% PAS:100% AD. The calorific value, bulk density, and energy density of the PAS, AD and PAS + AD pellets were in the range of 16.81-28.78 MJ kg-1 , 646-779 kg m-3 , and 10.86-22.71 GJ m-3 , respectively. Combustion image analysis results indicated the better flame richness and red color intensity of PAS + AD pellets than the both PAS and AD. Based on the results, almost 58% of the daily used fossil fuel coal for hot water production can be replaced by renewable PAS + AD pellets.

Biography

Dr. Aslı Simsek got her Master’s Degree in Environmental Engineer from the Faculty of Engineering, Sakarya University, Turkey in 2022. She researched poultry slaughterhouse waste stream to produce biofuel for internal utilization. Her related research paper was published in Renewable Energy journal. The research showed that PAS residue derived from poultry slaughterhouse and energy crops straw, produced using treated wastewater, are free of charge and shows a great potential to be integrated as a feedstock as raw material in fuel pellet production into the slaughterhouse water heating energy privation. Now she works as an environmental engineer and occupational health and safety specialist in a consulting company in Ankara, Turkey.

  • University of Pennsylvania, USA
  • Title:Current State of Industrial Heating and Opportunities for Decarbonization
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Abstract
In the United States, industrial emissions represent 22% of greenhouse gas emissions and are particularly hard to decarbonize, because (1) the processes emit CO2 as a byproduct of chemical reactions and (2) these industries require high-grade heat input. This study focuses on some of these industries, namely cement, lime, glass, and steelmaking. This work details the incumbent kiln and furnace technologies and explores the emerging processes with examples of existing projects that aim to reduce carbon emissions, such as carbon capture and storage (CCS), fuel switching, and other technological changes. We provide tools to evaluate the most appropriate low-carbon solutions at existing facilities and on new-build infrastructure while taking into account the local context and resources.
This presentation highlights one state within the U.S., California, as it has a high concentration of cement, lime, glass, and steelmaking facilities. The emissions from cement, lime, and glass facilities in California total 8.5 MtCO2eq/yr. About 6.3 MtCO2/yr (7.1% of in-state industrial emissions) could be captured from cement and lime facilities, transported, and stored in sedimentary basins below the Central Valley. Replacing 20% of coal by biomass could also reduce the fossil emissions by 0.5 MtCO2/yr (6.2% of in-state industrial emissions) without making changes to the facilities. As shown by this example, there are many strategies leading to the deep decarbonization of the economy and they need to be adapted to the local context.

Biography

Dr. Maxwell Pisciotta is a 3rd-year Ph.D. Candidate in Chemical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania where his research is focused on carbon capture and carbon removal technologies, economics, and policy. Max also holds a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. When Max is not in the lab or completing coursework, he volunteers his time with the Climate Leaders at Penn to help educate people with non-technical backgrounds about climate change and potential solutions.

  • Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Jordan
  • Title:Mineral Policy in MENA Countries: The Case of Jordan
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Abstract
This research paper intends to review the mineral development and investment policies of Jordan. The formulation of mining policies that will attract foreign investment must address conventionally acknowledged investor concerns and some new challenges. Issues that have been extensively examined in the paper include country’s characteristics such as geological, political, financial, regulatory, operational, fiscal, social and environmental, and profit and marketing criteria. Once these criteria are analyzed for Jordan, they have been compared to the MENA region to provide insights of possible changes and improvements to both the MENA and Jordan mineral policy. For some time, Jordan’s mineral policies were not favorable for developing the country’s mineral sector, but mineral policies are now being changed to address aspects that need improvement. With better mining regulations in place; more efficient regulatory agencies; more liberal foreign investment regulations; a competitive tax system; upgraded infrastructure; a greater availability of excellent local expertise and skills; as well as a stable economic and political system, this will position the MENA countries as an excellent place to invest in mining and create more economic diversity for the whole region.

Biography

Dr. Rami Al Rawashdeh is a Professor in Minerals Economics. He received his PhD degree in Minerals Economics from Curtin University of Technology, Australia in 2007. He received his Masters degree in Mining Engineering from Wollongong University, Australia in 2003. In 2009/2010, he held the position of the Assistant Dean of the Faculty of Engineering in Al-Hussein Bin Talal University; in 2017/2018 he was the head of Mining Engineering Department and currently he is a lecturer in the Department of Mining Engineering. He teaches courses related to mining engineering, engineering economics, engineering management for engineers,, renewable energy management, and resources evaluation. His research interests include minerals market analysis, minerals policy, feasibility of minerals projects, resource curse and economic development, and renewable energy management.

  • Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania
  • Title:Increasing the Efficiency of Triangle Solar Thermal Collectors with Internal Cavity by using Turbulators with Different Shapes
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Abstract
Sustainable energy technologies such as building integrated solar thermal systems may significantly contribute to the reduction of the greenhouse gases emissions by substituting a part of the fossil fuel used in buildings for space heating and domestic hot water preparation. Among these systems, solar thermal facades are good candidates when optimally oriented. Because the building facades are visible, the implementation of commercial solar thermal collector with rectangular shapes and dark colours may raise issues of architectural acceptance. To tackle these issues, non-rectangular (trapeze and triangle) solar thermal collectors with colored absorber plates (green, orange, red etc.) were developed in the Renewable Energy Systems and Recycling Research Centre of the Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania. The novel triangle solar thermal collector has an equilateral triangle shape, a small surface (0.06 m2) and non-dark colours (orange and green) allowing its integration in solar thermal facades with increased architectural acceptance and high coverage factor. Because of the small surface, the water circulates through an internal cavity beneath the entire absorber plate, instead of pipes as in the commercial solar thermal collectors having a significantly higher surface (around 2 m2). In the initial design of this novel solar thermal collector, a thickness of 20 mm resulted for the water layer in the internal cavity from constructive requirements. Indoor testing in standard conditions revealed color dependent efficiencies between 35 and 55%. To further increase the efficiency of the novel triangle solar thermal collector, an optimization process was developed by changing the water layer thickness and the mass flow rate. An absolute gain of 10.78% was obtained for the nominal efficiency and an average absolute gain of 10.35% over the entire range of inlet temperature by decreasing the thickness of the water layer to 5 mm while the mass flow rate was increased to
0.01 kg/s. In this paper, turbulators with various shapes installed in the internal cavity of the triangle solar thermal collector are considered to further improve its efficiency. The turbulators are modelled in SolidWorks and integrated in the 3D model of the triangle solar thermal collector. This 3D model is imported in Ansys Fluent for computational fluid dynamics simulations. The simulation results are comparatively discussed for the selected geometries of the turbulators. The influence of the shapes of the turbulators on the triangle solar thermal collector efficiency is analyzed.

Biography
Dr. Macedon Moldovan in 2013-2017 Lecturer at Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov 1997-2013 Design Engineer – Facilities for buildings, 2017-present Associate Professor at Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov, 2019-present Coordinator of the Study programme „Engineering of the Renewable Energy Systems”, Faculty of Product Design and Environment, Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania, 2019-present Deputy chairperson of the Technical Committee for Sustainable Energy Systems, International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science

  • Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates
  • Title:Unconventional Resources, Hydraulic Fracturing, Water Management and Insights for Middle Eastern Reservoirs
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Abstract
Water has been regarded as one of most important resources in the industrial sector and plays a pivotal role in the hydrocarbon industry. With modern advancements in technology, enhanced agricultural production and urbanization, numerous regions across the globe are currently facing water stress. Coupled with rapid population growth and energy demands, it is imperative to understand the influence of water resources within the hydrocarbon industry and examine current water management strategies. It is a need of the hour to enhance current strategies to source water more efficiently, especially within water scarce regions such as the Middle East.
Unconventional resources have significantly contributed to the modern energy market. However, extraction of hydrocarbon from unconventional reservoirs is heavily water-intensive as compared to conventional reservoirs. This comprehensive investigation analyzes key design parameters that affect productivity within typical Middle Eastern shale gas reservoirs. In addition, simple constrained cases were constructed to better understand the influence of these parameters with respect to the overall production and water requirement. Furthermore, potential regional challenges along with resource management strategies are also highlighted.
Biography
Dr. Rahman is an associate professor and has been teaching and conducting research since 2002 and has PhD in Petroleum Engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia. He published over 70 articles in the area of well stimulation, specifically in hydraulic fracturing, acid fracturing, and enhanced/improved oil and gas recovery and produced two patents. He was/is investigator of several external and internal funded research projects (funded by Abu Dhabi National Oil Company and Khalifa University). He served as technical committee member for several SPE conferences and workshops.

  • Russian State Agrarian University,Russia
  • Title:The Main Features of Global and Photosynthesis and its Evolution in the Global Carbon Turnover
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Abstract
From the point of a new model of global carbon turnover photosynthesis and its evolution should be considered only in connection with geological processes on the Earth. Global photosynthesis is the main element of the global carbon cycle and is the result of activity of all living on the planet photosynthesizing organisms. First it was shown that the global photosynthesis can be described by the same equation as traditional photosynthesis. Final approximation of this equation can be expressed as follows
hv (CO2+H2O)atmosphere+hydrosphere → COM + O2 atmosphere
The role of biomass in it is played by buried organic matter which is transformed biomass of organisms lived in the past. Most of the global photosynthesis features also similar to those of traditional one. According to the equation, the reaction substrate, concentration of CO2 in the environment, is inversely proportional to the reaction product, atmospheric oxygen concentration, whereas the reaction products, atmospheric O2 concentration and analog of biomass, the rate of accumulation of buried organic matter are proportional. The analysis shows that global photosynthesis has all the features of traditional photosynthesis, except the ability to ontogeny. Like traditional, global photosynthesis has photoassimilation and photorespiration. The amount of synthesized biomass depends on the CO2/O2 ratio in the environment. CO2 concentration growth in the environment provides increasing assimilation and biomass growth, O2 concentration growth stimulates photorespiration and reduces the biomass growth. Global photosynthesis has the ability to fractionate carbon isotopes. Increased assimilation leads to the enrichment of biomass with the 12C isotope. Increased photorespiration enriches biomass with 13C isotope. Cyclicity is the main feature of photosynthesis evolution. It is the result of its participation in orogenic cycles that ultimately arise due to the gravitational influence of celestial bodies on the earth’s orbital motion around the sun. This affects magma convection causing lithospheric plates’ motion. Moving plates collide and evolving energy initiates thermochemical sulfate reduction which oxidizes sedimentary organic matter. Resultant CO2 fills “atmosphere hydrosphere” system and stimulates photosynthesis. Subsequent development of photosynthesis reduces CO2 concentration and evolves O2. These sequence of events results in climatic and biotic turnover. All the sequence of events composes the orogenic cycles and ends with mass extinction of organisms. The participation in orogenic cycles provided repeated combination of CO2 entry and subsequent developing photosynthesis which completed by abrupt dramatic change for another cycle. Multiple repetition of photosynthesis dynamics against the background of progressive and irreversible changes in the oxygenation of the environment led to the consolidation of the most important useful properties of living systems. On the other hand, it brought the whole system to a stationary state.

Biography
Dr. Alexander Ivlev received his PhD (1968) in the Chemical Technology Institute of Mendeleyev (Moscow). The next PhD (1986), he got in the Institute of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences for research on biophysical mechanisms in photosynthesizing cell. In 2005 he was awarded the medal of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences “To Author of Scientific Discovery” for establishing link between distribution of carbon isotopes in metabolites and temporal organization of metabolic processes. Since 1971 he worked in the Scientific Research Institute of Oil Prospecting. In 1995 he became a Professor of Russian State Agrarian University. Here he discovered the carbon isotope effect in photorespiration (1993) and the oscillatory nature of photosynthesis (2004) and began the project “ Global Carbon Cycle”. He is an author of 5 scientific monographs and over 230 publications in Russian and foreign journals. His last monograph (2019) was published in Cambridge Scholars Publishing is entitled “The Global Carbon Cycle and the Evolution of Photosynthesis”.

  • Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil
  • Title:Biochar and Hydrochar in the Context of Anaerobic Digestion for a Circular Approach: an overview
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Abstract
Biochar and hydrochar are carbonaceous materials with valuable applications. They can be synthesized from a wide range of organic wastes, including digestate. Digestate is the byproduct of anaerobic digestion (AD), which is performed for bioenergy (biogas) production from organic residues. Through a thermochemical process, such as pyrolysis, gasification, and hydrothermal carbonization (HTC), digestate can be converted into biochar or hydrochar. The addition of either biochar or hydrochar in AD has been reported to improve biochemical reactions and microbial growth, increasing the buffer capacity, and facilitating direct interspecies electrons transfer (DIET), resulting in higher methane (CH4) yields. Both biochar and hydrochar can adsorb undesired compounds present in biogas, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and even siloxanes. However, an integrated understanding of biochar and hydrochar produced from digestate through their return to the AD process, as additives or as adsorbents for biogas purification, is yet to be attained to close the material flow loop in a circular economy model. Therefore, this overview aimed at addressing the integration of biochar and hydrochar production from digestate, their utilization as additives and effects on AD, and their potential to adsorb biogas contaminants. This integration is supported by life cycle assessment (LCA) studies, showing positive results when combining AD and the aforementioned thermochemical processes, although more LCA is still necessary. Techno-economic assessment (TEA) studies of the processes considered are also presented, and despite an expanding market of biochar and hydrochar, further TEA is required to verify the profitability of the proposed integration, given the specificities of each process design. Overall, the synthesis of biochar and hydrochar from digestate can contribute to improving the AD process, establishing a cyclic process that is in agreement with the circular economy concept.

Biography
Matheus Cavali holds a degree in Environmental and Sanitary Engineering from the Federal University of Fronteira Sul, Brazil, and a master’s degree in Bioprocess Engineering and Biotechnology from the Federal University of Paraná, Brazil. He researched biodiesel production from agro-industrial residues through chemical and enzymatic catalysis, and also pretreatment and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass for waste valorization. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the Graduate Program in Environmental Engineering at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil, where he researches hydrochar production. He has published in different peer-reviewed journals.

  • Cairo University, Egypt
  • Title:Integrated Approach for Sustainability Assessment in Power Plant Projects using Building Information Modeling
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Abstract

This research proposes a framework for sustainability assessment for power plant projects. The proposed framework integrates sustainability and Building Information Modeling (BIM) to achieve enhanced results concerning sustainability assessment in the power plants sector. International and regional sustainability rating systems as well as design guidelines are studied to develop a new sustainability assessment system dedicated to power plant projects. A total of 54 criteria, clustered in eight categories, are considered in the rating system. These categories are: 1) Nature and Urban 2) Site, 3) Energy, 4) Water, 5) Materials and Resources,
6) Emissions and Environment, 7) Operation and Management, and 8) Culture and economy. The sustainability levels are ranked in six levels: Non-Sustainable, Improved, Enhanced, Superior, Conserving, Restorative. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is implemented to set the weights of the criteria that are considered in the proposed sustainability system. BIM is utilized to develop a plugin for the proposed rating system to determine the level of sustainability of power plant projects. The developed plugin invests the BIM model attributes to provide the stakeholder with an instantaneous sustainability metric tool that saves time and reduces the possible errors. A case study of a 100 MW power plant is presented to test the effectiveness of the developed approach in the sustainability assessment.

Biography

Dr. Ali Azzam is a Senior piping design and stress analysis Engineer in Petrojet company in Egypt. He got his Master’s Degree in integrated Engineer in in Design Projects from the Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University in 2020. His research interest is sustainable development asset integrity, mainly in Energy and oil fields. His related research paper was published in Energy for Sustainable development journal, which is Q1 ranked. The research provided an advanced dynamic method for measuring the sustainability of power plants projects by linking the criteria with the Parametric design in the Engineering design software platform, which introduces more accurate and instant results. He got the certification of Leadership in Energy and Environment Design Green Associate (LEED GA) in 2020. From 2014 he worked as a design engineer in Infrastructure, Power generation plants, and Oil and Gas fields. He participated in Megaprojects of design and rehabilitation of Infrastructure and Energy projects in Asia, Africa, and the Middle. In 2021 he started his Ph.D. journey in the Mechanical Design and Production Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Egypt. In 2021 he established his own company which provides Engineering solutions in Infrastructure and oil fields.

  • Bharathi Women’s College, India
  • Title:A Review on the Remediation of Microplastics using Bionanomaterials
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Abstract

Microplastics are formed by the physicochemical breakdown of plastics. It is an alarming worldwide issue with long-lasting and hazardous effects. Natural expulsion of microplastics would take several years and it might also result in dangerous outcomes. To remediate these harmful microplastics several technological innovations were developed over the years. Among them, nanotechnological techniques have been investigated to a large extent for the remediation of microplastics. However, the production of nanomaterials using physical and chemical methods have been proven to be hazardous to the environment in several ways. Bio-nanotechnology is an alternative solution. Though it is a well-known and much investigated topic, it still remains primitive when it comes to microplastic remediation. Knowledge about the extensive possibilities of bionanoremediation would serve to be useful for the researchers to develop advanced eco-friendly strategies to control and eradicate the microplastics in a sustainable manner.

Biography

Rose Mary Kiriyanthan Graduate in Plant biology and Plant Biotechnology, and a Masters in Biotechnology from Stella Maris College (Autonomous) affiliated to the University of Madras, Chennai. Currently pursuing Ph.D. in Botany from Bharathi women’s college (Autonomous) affiliated to the University of Madras, Chennai. My research experience spanning for over 4 years helped me gain 5 publications in peer reviewed journals. My research interest includes Bio-nanotechnology and Phytochemistry.

  • University of Hasselt, Belgium.
  • Title:Biodiversity of Collembola on Green Roofs: A case Study of Three Cities in Belgium
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Abstract
Green roofs are often promoted as a mean to counter the negative environmental effects of urbanization on nature and to increase the amount of green space in cities. Green roofs often enhance aboveground biodiversity, especially herbivores and pollinators. However, if and in what way they support belowground biodiversity, and more specifically soil fauna, is rarely studied. Therefore, we evaluated the diversity of a dominant group of soil fauna, Collembola (springtails), on twelve extensive green roofs in three cities in Belgium (Antwerp, Ghent and Hasselt), over a one year period. The roofs differed in height above the ground, surface area, vegetation type, and age, i.e. time since construction. We analysed if these roof characteristics influenced species richness, abundance or diversity of Collembola. In total we found ten species of Collembola. Species richness was not higher on roofs that were larger (habitat area) or closer to the ground (isolation to surrounding soil), indicating that island-biogeographic theory is not applicable to species richness in our study system. However, significant differences in the mean number of individuals (abundance) were found between different months. Collembola taxonomical composition also varied between the roofs, but this variation could not be related to any of the measured roof variables. Roof communities were characterised by hemiedaphic life forms, preferring neutral to semi-moist conditions. Apart from the age of the roof that showed a positive significant impact on the abundance of Collembola present, our results suggested that the collembolan fauna showed no significant differences in abundance, species richness or diversity between roofs with different characteristics. However, we suggest that future studies are needed to investigate whether our findings are applicable to other groups of soil-living arthropods on green roofs.

Biography:
Dr Jeffrey Jacobs Master of science: evolution en behavioural-biology
PhD Research project: Biodiversity on urban green roofs: a focus on macro-invertebrates
Hisresearch focuses on assessing the biodiversity on green roofs. Green roofs have potential for providing substantial habitat to plants, birds, and arthropod species that are not well supported by other urban habitats. Whereas the plants on a typical green roof are chosen and planted by people, the arthropods that colonize it can serve as an indicator of the ability of this novel habitat to support a diverse community of organisms.
In the first part of my PhD he focussed on belowground biodiversity, which was assessed for a deliberately chosen group of soil arthropods: the springtails (Collembola). Collembola are among the most abundant and widespread terrestrial arthropods, and are important in many soil functions such as litter decomposition and nutrient cycling. However, what explains their diversity and species composition in isolated, small habitat fragments is less known.
Furthermore, are we currently investigating multiple green roofs in the city of Antwerp (Belgium) and focussing on the aboveground macro-invertebrates that live on them (main focus wild bees). This research has the potential to contribute to the academic understanding of biodiversity on green roofs, but more than this, it may have an impact on wider society. With worldwide increasing urbanization it is crucial that we understand how we can counteract the loss of biodiversity in urban areas. Green roofs are seen as the number one method to get more green spaces in cities, however there is a lack of studies in Belgium on green roofs and how they can support biodiversity. We hope that by doing so we can derive main principles regarding the design of green roofs with the aim of maximizing their macro-invertebrate biodiversity.

  • University of Milan-Bicocca, Italia
  • Title:The Self-assembly of Sepiolite and Silica fillers for Advanced Rubber Materials: The Role of Collaborative Filler Network
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Abstract
SiO2-based nanofillers, commonly used to enhance the mechanical properties in tyres, favor a low hysteresis while maintaining sufficient reinforcement respect to the carbon black. However, a need remains to further reduce the rolling resistance of the tyres, and so to identify new fillers that allow a further improvement in the balance between hysteresis and reinforcement of materials. In this context, the present work aims at studying the self-assembly of two different white nanofillers, such as sepiolite and silica, and the role of collaborative filler network in rubber nanocomposites (NCs), considering that clay/silica hybrid systems could be a possible strategy to reduce the hysteresis of rubber materials, thanks to the potential synergistic effect between isotropic and anisotropic fillers.
Thus, rubber NCs containing silica and different kind of sepiolite were prepared by combining latex compounding technique (LCT) and melt blending. Highly filled NR masterbatches (MBs) were firstly prepared by coagulating natural rubber (NR) latex and sepiolite aqueous suspension, and then mixed with NR rubber matrix together with silica filler, silane coupling agent, vulcanizing agents, and antioxidants. An exhaustive morphological, rheological, and dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrates that the use of double white fillers, having different aspect ratios, allows to obtain a good trade-off between efficient reinforcement and low Payne effect. These results have been ascribed to the formation of a cooperative filler network, deriving from the remarkable interaction of both fillers with the polymer, as assessed by morphological and spectroscopic investigations.
This study, even if referred to clay/silica double fillers, provides clear evidence of the significant role of self-assembly of hybrid nanofillers to produce a collaborative filler network and thus advanced rubber materials.

Biography

Graduated in Chemistry in 2001 at University “La Sapienza” of Rome, she obtained the PhD in Inorganic Chemistry at University of Florence. After working as post-doctoral researcher at Politecnico of Milano and at University of Milano Bicocca (Unimib), in March 2015, she became Assistant Professor of Fundamentals of Chemical Technologies at Unimib. She is a member of PhD Council on Materials Science and Nanotechnology, PhD Program of University of Milano- Bicocca. She coordinates the activity research of PhD students of CORIMAV (Consortium for research on materials between Unimib and Pirelli) and is responsible and referent for the research activity involving Pirelli Tyre.
She has advanced background in design and development of nanocomposite, hybrid and smart materials. Her research interests are nanostructured oxides and organic-inorganic materials for environmental cleaning, and design and development of rubber composites. She co-authored more than 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 4 book chapters, 7 patents, and involved in many national and international research projects.

  • Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:On the Development Of a Simplified Model For Thermal Comfort Control of Split Systems
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ABSTRACT
Despite split-type systems for cooling purposes became popular in countries such as China, Japan. India, Indonesia and Brazil, their use commonly promote high gradients of both temperature and air velocity in rooms which may cause considerable thermal discomfort. Hence, this work aims at developing a simplified thermal comfort index, based on temperature and air speed, in order to develop controllers for those types of air conditioning systems, replacing the traditional on-off temperature set-point control by an effective and inexpensive thermal-comfort based control. The work is focused on the assessment of comfort in classrooms by carrying out measurements according to ISO 7730 and ASHRAE 55 Standards, which defines the thermal satisfaction in occupied environments based on the PMV index. Specifically, the speed, temperature and relative humidity of the air and the mean radiant temperature of the room were measured at eight positions within the space. The field experiments were performed considering two 10.5-kW cooling capacity appliances installed in different positions relatively to the layout of the room, considering three levels of supply airflow (high, medium and low) and three set-point temperatures (23, 24 and 25 °C). An analysis of uncertainties is presented for PMV measurements and a regression analysis was applied to the measured data to determine a simplified correlation between thermal comfort (by means of the PMV index) air temperature and air velocity, aiming at developing afterwards a control device based on thermal comfort instead of temperature setpoint only. Results are shown in terms of distribution of air speed, air temperature and PMV index for the two configurations of equipment installation, as well as the resulting empirical model correlating thermal comfort index with both temperature and air speed. In addition, thermal comfort opinions from a survey are contrasted with the simplified thermal comfort model.

  • Geophysical Institute of Peru,Peru.
  • Title:On the Dynamic Mechanisms of Intense Rainfall Events in the Central Andes of Peru, Mantaro Valley
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Abstract
The present study was aimed at analyzing the main atmospheric dynamic mechanisms associated with the occurrence of intense rainfall events above the Huancayo observatory (12.05°S, 75.32°W, 3313 m asl) in the central Andes of Perú (Mantaro valley) from January 2018 to April 2019. To identify the rainfall events, we used a set of instruments from the laboratory of physics, microphysics and radiation (LAMAR) composed by in-situ pluviometric observations, satellite remote sensing data (GPM), Cloud Radar (MIRA- 35c), Boundary Layer Tropospheric Radar (BLTR) and downscaling model simulations with WRF (resolutions: 18 km, 6 km and 2 km) and ARPS (0.5 km) models to analyze the dynamics of the atmosphere for the synoptic, meso and local processes that control the occurrence of these rainfall events. The results showed that all intense rainfall events are associated with the presence of thermal meso-scale circulations that transport moisture fluxes through passes with gentle slopes along both sides of the Andes. The easterly moisture fluxes come in from the South America Low Level Jet (SALLJ) and the westerly moisture fluxes from the Pacific Ocean. The arrival of these moisture flows to regions within the Mantaro valley depends on their coupling with the circulations at medium and high levels of the atmosphere. At the synoptic scale, the results show that the rainfall events can be separated into two groups: the first one associated with westerly circulations (WC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the weakening and eastern displacement of the anticyclonic Bolivian high-North east low (BH-NE) system, and the second associated with easterly circulations (EC) at the mid and upper levels of the atmosphere, generated by the intensification of the BH-NE system. The observed and simulated results showed that multicell convective systems of WC events are more extensive and deeper than EC events. This situation can be explained as the convergence of moisture fluxes from opposite directions occurred within the Mantaro basin for WC events. In contrast, for EC events, the convergence develops at the east Andes mountain range, following which the multicell storm system propagates westward, driven by easterly circulations. The EC events occur mostly in the summer months, while the WC events occur mostly in the autumn and spring months. Moreover, apparently the inertia gravity waves (IGWs) formed in the Amazon basin transport moisture and energy to the central Andes plateau and intensify the convection processes.

Biography
Dr. Jose Flores Rojas Graduated in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Physics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, master in Meteorology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). He is Doctor in atmospheric sciences by the Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Sao Paulo (IAG-USP). He has experience in the areas of Physics and Geosciences, with emphasis on Quantum Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, acting mainly on the following topics: Quantum Optics, Solar and Terrestrial Radiation, Meso Meteorology and Microscale and Earth Physics.

  • State University Center of the West Zone, Brazil
  • Title:Phthalates in Avicennia Schaueriana, a Mangrove Species, in the State Biological Reserve, Guaratiba, RJ, Brazil
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Abstract
Phthalates are the most common plasticizer compounds worldwide, providing flexibility to a wide array of plastic products. The inadequate disposal of these chemical residues causes their absorption and accumulation by plant species in contaminated environments. The absorption and accumulation of phthalates in the mangrove species Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae) were monitored over one year. A total of 30 fresh and dried leaf extract samples were collected through the “serapilheira system”, in the Guaratiba Biological Reserve in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in three different regions of the Guaratiba mangrove forest: A (fringe), C (basin), and E (transition). Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Bis-tridecyl phthalate was the main contaminant detected, and bis- isobutyl phthalate and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate were the major metabolites of the butanolic fraction obtained from the liquid-liquid partition of the ethanolic leaf extract. The observed chemical profile was rich in secondary metabolites, predominantly lupeol and 𝛼-amyrin. Exposure to these contaminants presents several risks to human health. This is the first work to confirm how the mangrove pollution process, through the accumulation of plastic contaminants in sediments and water, can directly affect the plant species and their biosynthesis.
Biography
Catharina Eccard Fingolo is professor in the Pharmacy Course and Postgraduate Program in Environmental Science and Technology at the Centro Universitário Estadual da Zona Oeste – UEZO, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She works with environmental sciences, with emphasis on environmental contaminants of mangrove ecosystem, analysis of chemical markers, and biological activities of the mangrove species: Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa, and Rhizophora mangle. She has doctorate degree in Chemistry of Natural Products and master degree in Plant Biotechnology from the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  • Poznan University of Life Sciences ,Poland.
  • Title:Terpenes in Conifers Under Developmental and Environmental Stimuli
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Abstract

Among a wide variety of natural compounds synthesized by conifer trees, terpenes seem to be the most important group of secondary metabolites. They are a vital part of constitutive or induced defense mechanisms to protect the plant from invading pathogens and herbivore. Furthermore, they can take part in chemo-ecological interactions with co-evolved insects, e.g. bark beetles. Some of terpenes are known to manifest antioxidant properties which may contribute to their role in overcoming oxidative stress. It has been also suggested that
volatile compounds such as terpenes can be involved in interplant signaling, especially concerning biotic or mechanical stress. Numerous studies have shown that abiotic and biotic stress factors such as drought, temperature fluctuations, air and soil pollution or pathogen attack may affect the biosynthesis and emission of terpenes, and the response may depend on the stressor type and stress intensity. Although the general composition of terpenes is characteristic for each species, it has been shown that it can even differ between two individual trees, depending on tree chemotype. Despite many comprehensive studies in this area, the role of terpenes in plants is not completely understood. Some of the available results are contradictory. Here we present an overview of recent literature in this area to systematize the observed changes in terpene quantity and quality in conifer trees. The study is focused on three most important forest-forming conifer genera of European temperate climate zone – pine (Pinus sp.), spruce (Picea sp.) and fir (Abies sp.) due to their high utility and wide range of occurrence. Moreover, we tried to shed light on a complex function of these interesting compounds in view of progressive climate change.

Biography
Joanna Maria Kopaczyk is a Biologist, PhD student at Poznan University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Utilization, in cooperation with the Department of Plant Ecophysiology at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Faculty of Biology. Her current work focuses specifically on molecular and biochemical aspects of xylem formation in conifer trees.

  • Federal Technological University of Parana, Brazil
  • Title:Quality Reference Values for Heavy Metals In Soils Developed from Basic Rocks under Tropical Conditions.
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Abstract

Soil Quality Reference Values (QRV) refer to the natural heavy metal concentrations that is not influenced or is minimally influenced by anthropogenic activities. Such values are unique of each environment, and their extrapolation to different locations becomes inadequate. This research aimed to determine the natural concentrations of metals in soils (QRV) developed on essentially basaltic lithology and tropical conditions in the south of Brazil. Seventy-two soil samples from the Forest Conservation Areas in the west of the state of Paraná, Brazil, were obtained. The extraction and dosage of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were carried out employing methods USEPA 3051a and ICP-OES. The QRV was set to 75th percentile of each element, from the detection and exclusion of the outliers. The natural concentration of all heavy metals was related to the geological context of the basaltic area in Brazil. There was no influence of the pedogenetic degree of soils on the natural heavy metal concentration. The only relevant process for reducing the natural heavy metal levels was the Fe and Mn oxide solubility promoted by hydromorphic conditions. Fe oxides had a significant role in the maintenance of structural and adsorbed heavy metal forms in soils. The results may help the research and monitoring of environmental heavy metals in soils developed from basalt under tropical conditions.

Biography

Dr. Juliane Maria Bergamin Bocardi has doctorate in Applied Chemistry, with an emphasis on Environmental Chemistry, from the State University of the Midwest, Paraná, Brazil (UNICENTRO). She has master’s degree in Applied Chemistry with an emphasis on Natural Products from the State University of Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil (UEPG) and a degree in Chemistry from the State University of Western Paraná (UNIOESTE). She is currently Chemistry professor in the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Brazil, campus Medianeira (UTFPR). Develops activities in the areas of Environmental Chemistry such as environmental monitoring and control.

  • Wayne State University ,USA
  • Title:An Enolate-Mediated Regioselective Synthesis of 1,2,3-Triazoles via Azide-Aldehydes or Ketones [3+2]- Cycloaddition Reactions in Aqueous Phase
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Abstract

Objectives: We present a ‘greener’ synthesis for the direct conversion of arylazides into the corresponding trizoles
via phase transfer catalyst-assisted [3+2] cycloaddition in aqueous phase.
Methods: The synthesis of triazoles were approached (Figure 1) based on previously published methods for azide- aldehyde [1] and azide-ketone [2]. In an ordinary glass tube equipped with a magnetic stirring bar, to aldehydes or ketones (0.21 mmol), TBAHS (0.042 mmol) and KOH (0.42 mmol) were added successively in Milli-Q water (1 mL) at RT. Finally, corresponding arylazide (0.21 mmol) was added to above RM. This RM was stirred at RT for 2 minutes which was subsequently heated for 24 h to 48 h at 100 °C. The reaction progress was monitored by TLC and after consumption of starting aldehyde/ketone, RM was cooled to RT. The crude RM was extracted with ethyl acetate and it was dried over Na2SO4, filtered and concentrated. Product 3 was obtained by column chromatography and characterized by using NMR and MS.
Results: Present synthetic approach covering a structurally diverse group of aryl azides 1(a-e) and aldehydes 2(a-b) or ketones 2(g–n) to obtain high yields of varieties of triazoles. In addition, the excellent yields are even more impressive considering that water was the only solvent. Overall, our methodology has proven robust and demonstrated by the preparation of twenty-seven different triazoles, fourteen of them reported for the first time.

Conclusions: We have developed a simple, versatile, and green route for enolate-mediated azide-aldehyde or ketone [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction which enables the synthesis of triazoles containing a variety of functional groups with excellent regioselectivity using water as the only solvent. This water-compatible and phase transfer catalyst- assisted catalytic synthetic approach which provides a stepping stone towards a greener organic synthesis in pharmaceutical industries.

Biography

Dr. Sameer Joshi was born and raised in Pune, India. After finishing my Masters degree with specialization in Organic Chemistry at the University of Pune, India (2009) He joined the National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) also in Pune, where He stayed for 1 & 1/2 years. Then, I spent 2 years working in a private pharmaceutical company in Pune, India. At the beginning of 2013, He was offered the Ph.D. opportunity to become a member of Dr. Llop´s research group at CIC biomaGUNE, Spain. Later, He joined the group in October 2013 and finally He have completed his Ph.D. on June 1st 2017 by working on the development of new strategies for the synthesis of 13N‐labelled compounds. In 2017, I began my first post doctoral position in National Chemical Laboratory (NCL), Pune, India. Here, main objective of the project to achieve click chemistry of triazoles using Azide ‐Aldehydes or Ketones [3+2]‐cycloaddition reactions using water as a green solvent. Presently, He is working as a Research Associate at Wayne State University, Detroit, USA since October 2018. Currently, He is developing the novel radiotracers with F‐18 for HDACs. He have six scientific international publications till date. He presented or participated in five different international conferences and one of my poster presentation in ISRS 2015 was selected as an outstanding poster in University of Missouri, USA. he received European prestigious Marie Curie Fellowship and National Post Doctoral fellowship under my research study.

  • Rosen College University of Central Florida ,USA
  • Title:Extending Tourism Competitiveness to Human Development
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Abstract

The study examines a recursive dynamic between tourism competiveness and human development. While, a connection between two concepts is arguable, tourism competitiveness provides the resources necessary to support and sustain expansion of human developments. Higher income countries exhibit healthier, productive and longer leaving populace relative to lower income countries. Thus, indicating that high income matters in shaping and supporting human development. Tourism competitiveness provides a chance to increase income opportunities and improve human development growth that includes one’s health, education and skill which in turn contribute to the increase in tourism competitiveness. However, little is known about nature, influences and dynamics between tourism competitiveness and human development. The study asses several research questions: 1. What creates the theoretical connection between tourism competitiveness and human development? 2. Does this connection explains differences in tourism competitiveness over time.

Biography

Dr. Valeriya Shapoval is an assistant professor at the University of Central Florida with areas of expertise in tourism, organizational psychology and big data analytics. She had published in the top hospitality and tourism journal such as Annals of Tourism Research, Journal of Travel Research and many others. Currently she is a managing editor of International Journal of Hospitality Management that is a 4th leading journal in the hospitality and tourism with SSCI impact factor of 4.46. She is a part of the Dick Pope Jr. Institute at Rosen college and was part of several international projects in the Caribbean Island that were focused on using tourism development to improved Islands’ local population living standards and increase of opportunities for improvement in employment and business.

  • University of Rennes,France
  • Title:Improvement of Fermentation From Hydrolysate of Green Macroalgae for Bioethanol Production on a Lab- Scale and on a Pilot-Scale
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Abstract

The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of ethanol bioproduction from hydrolysate of macroalgea. Firstly, experiments were carried out with a synthetic medium adjusted on algal hydrolysate composition with four yeast strains: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis, Candida guilliermondii and Kluyveromyces marxianus. Nitrogen source, inoculum size and salt contents were examined.
Secondly, the study focused on the fermentation of hydrolysate from the green macroalgae Ulva rigida, confirming the possibility of converting algal hydrolysate into bioethanol, without nitrogen enrichment and sterilization. It was observed that pH regulation and aeration were not essential for the ethanol production. In these conditions, the experiment gave a concentration of 12 g L-1 and the conversion rate of glucose into bioethanol reached 82%. For the lab-scale assays, the media volume varied between 250 to 1 500 mL.
Finally, the scale up process was examined on a pilot scale (77 L) using S. cerevisiae growing on a hydrolysate of Chaetomorpha sp. This experiment gave a concentration of 5.6 g L-1 (lower than the results obtained during previous tests because of the limited hydrolysis yield), but with an efficiency of 97%.

Biography

Dr. Hayet DJELAL is Associate Professor at UniLasalle-Ecole des Métiers de l’Environnement, France. Her main research activities are related to Bioprocess Engineering, particularly chemical and bioprocesses development, development of elimination of micropollutants and biotreatment of industrial wastewater. She also works on aerobic and anaerobic fermentation technologies.
She supervised 7 PhD thesis concluded and 3 others are in progress, as well as more than 10 Master students. She has published 55 articles in scientific international journals with peer reviewing and she is associate editor of one scientific journal. She participated and coordinated several scientific projects with external financial support and she is implicated in national and international collaborations as Mexico, Algeria, Tunisia, Lebanon …

  • Systems Engineering Department, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
  • Title:Event-Triggered Feedback Control for Distributed Systems
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Abstract

An integral ingredient to the operation of industrial or engineering systems, including cooperative robotics, sensor networks, and grid computing, is that its control architecture consisting of hardware and software protocols for exchanging system status and control signals. Current trends to control and monitor the operation of industrial or engineering systems are moving toward the use of an automated agent technology or distributed networked systems (DNS). A distributed networked system is a combination of several units working in collaboration pursuing assigned tasks to achieve the overall goal of the system.
In this presentation, we focus control strategies pertaining to DNS. Specifically, we address the issue of event-triggered feedback strategy in which the unit (local) control is equipped with additional information from neighbors (unit-to-unit communication) to achieve the global motion-coordination task. Our main goal is illuminate the merits/demerits of the foregoing strategy as well as the potential applications.

biography

Dr. Magdi S. Mahmoud has been a Professor of Engineering since 1984. He is now a Distinguished Professor at KFUPM, Saudi Arabia. He served at different universities worldwide including Egypt (CU, AUC), Kuwait (KU), UAE (UAEU), UK (UMIST), USA (Pitt, Case Western), Singapore (Nanyang) and Australia (Adelaide). He lectured in Venezuela (Caracas), Germany (Hanover), UK ((Kent), USA (UoSA), Canada (Montreal) and China (BIT, Yanshan). He is the principal author of fifty-one (51) books, inclusive book-chapters and the author/co-author of more than 610 peer-reviewed papers. He is a fellow of the IEE, a senior member of the IEEE, the CEI (UK), and a registered consultant engineer of information engineering and systems (Egypt).

  • James Cook University , Singapore
  • Title: A Circular Economy Approach to Green Energy: Wind Turbine, Waste, and Material Recovery
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Abstract

Wind energy has been considered as one of the greenest renewable energy
sources over the last two decades. However, attention is turning to reducing the possible environmental impacts from this sector. We argue that wind energy would not be effectively ‘‘green” if anthropogenic materials are not given attention in a responsible manner. Using the concept of the circular economy, this paper considers how anthropogenic materials in the form of carbon fibers can reenter the circular economy system at the highest possible quality.b This paper first investigates the viability of a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer extraction process using thermal pyrolysis to recalibrate the maximum carbon fiber value by examining the effect of (a) heating rate, (b) temperature, and (c) inert gas flow rate on char yield. With cleaner and higher quality recovered carbon fibers, this paper discusses the economic preconditions for the takeoff and growth of the industry and recommends the reuse of extracted carbon fibers to close the circular economy loop.

Biography

Professor Adrian T. H. Kuah has investigated circular economy practices in Asia, measured perceptions toward remanufactured goods in the UK, examined photovoltaic tax incentives in China, and provided insights on material circular economy using composite recovery. In 2019, he was appointed by the Government to partake and represent Singapore’s interest in the standardization of ISO/TC 323 Circular Economy at the ISO. For his thought leadership, he was interviewed by leading newspapers such as the Financial Times, Straits Times, Cairns Post and Xinhua News, as well as by media such as the Australian WIN TV News. He has received a couple of citations, including Financial Times Professor of the Week (2013) and Oxford Scholarship (2014). He is a research leader at both The Cairns Institute, Australia and Centre for International Trade and Business in Asia, Singapore. He is also Professor at Ecole de Commerce de Tahiti in the French Polynesia. He received his Ph.D from the University of Manchester, ITP from SDA Bocconi, MBA from University of Strathclyde, and B.Eng from the Nanyang Technological University.

  • Osaka University, Japan
  • Title:Computational Molecular Modeling of Pt-Coupled TiO2 Photocatalysis: Sensitization Action of TiO2 Clusters for Effective Water Photo-Splitting Under UV Light Irradiance
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Abstract

Computational molecular modeling, i.e., density functional theory-based molecular modelling (DFT B3LYP/6-31-G*) (DFT/MM) verifies equilibrium geometry and surface electron energy structures of van der Waals force (vdW) molecular aggregates. What should be noted for the energy structures is that DFT/MM-predicted UV/Vis spectra are in good agreement with measured spectra of the aggregates.1) With these viewpoints, effective photoelectrochemical water splitting using mesoporous TiO2 anode and platinum cathode2), and effective water photo-splitting to HOOH and H2 on Pt-loaded TiO2 photocatalysts3) are reinvestigated by DFT/MM. DFT/MM-based UV/Vis spectrum analysis verifies that the anatase Yamashita & Jono’s model of HOTi9O18H has no absorption in the UV region, giving visible absorption spectrum with max=536 nm (strength 0.005). Then, DFT/MM was extended to vdW aggregates of smaller-size TiO2 clusters, (TiO2)n (n=1, 2, 4). Interestingly, DFT/MM-derived UV/Vis spectrum of (TiO2)4 shows max at 377 nm (strength 0.003), and the vdW aggregates of (TiO2)4 with H2O and with platinum triangle pole cluster of Pt6 validates that the molecular-structured TiO2 clusters, (TiO2)1~4 work as effective UV-induced photocatalysts2), and work as a UV-sensitizer in photoelectrochemical water splitting on biased TiO2 anode3).
1) Japanese Journal of Applied Physics 57, 121602 (2018).
2) Molecules 2015, 20(6), 9732-9744.
3) ECS Transactions, 80 (10) 1091-1112 (2017).

Biography

Dr. Shozo Yanagida is an emeritus professor of Osaka University since 2004 and a research director of “Research Association for Technological Innovation of Organic Photovoltaics” (RATO) of University of Tokyo. A year ago, he started research laboratory, “M3 Laboratory Inc.” in ISRI, Osaka University. When he was staying at SERI (now ENREL) as a visiting professor of Dr. A. Nozik’s group in 1984, he understand that organic and inorganic molecules have a strong tendency to aggregate each other via van der Waals and Coulomb interaction, forming two, three and four molecule aggregates, i.e., molecular structured aggregates. Now, he is focusing DFT/MM on functional materials as molecular vdW aggregates.

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